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BA (Hons) History/Economics

Learn how studying the past can help us predict market futures

Year of entry: 2024/25

UCAS code

VL11

Institution code

Y50

Length

3 years full-time (plus optional placement year)

UK (home) fees

£9,250 per year

International and EU fees

£23,700 per year

Undergraduate Open Days

Book your place for our Open Days on 22 and 23 June and 6 and 7 September.

Book your place

in the UK for history

Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2024

in the UK for history

Complete University Guide 2025

in the Russell Group for 'Teaching on my course'

of institutions included in the National Student Survey 2023 for finance.

Economics uses theory and empirical evidence to explain the dynamism of economic systems. History seeks to understand social, political, and intellectual shifts as well as to determine the causes and consequences of economic trends.

Applications for this course are closed to UK (home) applicants for 2024/25. Applications for 2025/26 will open in September.

Our BA History and Economics brings these disciplines together, teaching you to use the past to examine economic problems societies face today.

You'll join two highly-performing research intensive departments and graduate as a critical thinker, effective communicator and creative and analytical problem solver. 

World leading research

Both departments have impressive research reputations. You'll be taught by academics at the forefront of their field.

Research excellence

Our Department of Economics and Related Studies is 14th in the UK for research - according to the Times Higher Education’s ranking of the latest REF results (2021).

Course content

Your modules in History progress from broad to specialised topics. Core modules in the first year introduce you to the broad sweep of history across time and place and historical problems. You develop this in the following years, cultivating your expertise, and - if you choose - leading up to an 8,000-word dissertation in your final year.

In Economics, you'll be introduced to key topics during Year 1. Years 2 and 3 will enable you to consolidate and expand upon this knowledge via a series of study modules which have been developed to give you a thorough understanding of the subject.

Study abroad

There are opportunities for you to spend time abroad during your course:

Placements

There are opportunities to spend time in industry as part of this course.

Year 1

Your first year introduces several economic theories, in addition to covering basic historical perspectives on markets and economic trends.

Core modules

Option modules

You will choose three option modules:

Academic integrity module

In addition to the above you will also need to complete our online Academic Integrity module.

Year 2

Your second year focuses on important domestic and international economic concepts. You'll connect these ideas with an in-depth look into a specific historical period of your choice.

Core modules

Option modules

You will also study three option modules. In semester one, you'll study either Microeconomic Theory or Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy core modules, plus two option modules (one in Economics and one History Exploration module). You can alternatively choose to take both of these Economics core modules, plus one History Exploration module. In semester two, you'll study two core modules and either one History Exploration modules or an elective.

Economics
History Explorations

Elective modules

You may be able to replace one option module with an elective module, studying a complementary subject, a language or an interdisciplinary topic.

Year 3

In your final year of the History and Economics degree, you will study one core module, plus three option modules - including one History Special Subject (taken in two parts, one per semester). You will then choose between taking additional History and Economics option modules and writing an 8,000-word History dissertation.

Core module

Option modules

or

  • one Comparative History option module, and one Economics option module or an elective module, or
  • two Economics option modules OR two elective modules.
Economics
Comparative History
History - Special Subjects

Elective modules

You may be able to replace one option module with an elective module, studying a complementary subject, a language or an interdisciplinary topic.

Our modules may change to reflect the latest academic thinking and expertise of our staff, and in line with Department/School academic planning.

Learning by design

Every course at York has been designed to provide clear and ambitious learning outcomes. These learning outcomes give you an understanding of what you will be able to do at the end of the course. We develop each course by designing modules that grow your abilities towards the learning outcomes and help you to explain what you can offer to employers. Find out more about our approach to teaching and learning.

Students who complete this course will be able to:

  • Communicate in-depth understandings of historical scholarship, including the historical development of contemporary economic systems and institutions, and apply concepts and principles derived from economics to the interpretation of the past.
  • Approach problems in a critical and questioning fashion, including the evaluation of existing arguments, economic models and methods, and the assessment of the value and significance of different forms of data and evidence.
  • Engage with a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives on economic systems and make comparisons and connections between the economic features of different periods, places and societies at a local and global level.
  • Explore the causes of a historical or contemporary issue and make predictions, including identifying useful social, economic and financial data, constructing meaningful questions, deploying models, and applying mathematical methods and tools.
  • Move at ease between a variety of information types, including material culture, visual imagery and databases with particular strengths in understanding and deploying information from texts and statistical, econometric and computer data.
  • Convey complex ideas with clarity and precision and make sophisticated, original and persuasive arguments or predictions based on qualitative evidence, modelling techniques and data analysis.
  • Manage time and work load effectively in order to complete a project or execute a programme alone or in collaboration with others.
  • Use insights gained from the study of the factors that have shaped the economic life of different societies across history, and around the world, to engage constructively and critically with the political, cultural, social and economic aspects of contemporary debate and policy making.

Fees and funding

Annual tuition fees

UK (home) International and EU
£9,250 £23,700

UK (home) or international fees?

The level of fee that you will be asked to pay depends on whether you're classed as a UK (home) or international student. Check your fee status.

Fees for subsequent years

  • UK (home) fees may increase within the government fee cap in subsequent academic years. We will notify you of any increase as soon as we can.
  • International fees are subject to increase in subsequent years in line with the prevailing Consumer Price Index (CPI) inflation rate (up to a maximum of 10%).

More information

For more information about tuition fees, any reduced fees for study abroad and work placement years, scholarships, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs see undergraduate fees and funding.

Additional costs

You will have to pay for the cost of printing some assignments for submission as assessed work in Years 2 and 3.

Funding

We'll confirm more funding opportunities for students joining us in 2024/25 throughout the year.

Department funding

Living costs

You can use our living costs guide to help plan your budget. It covers additional costs that are not included in your tuition fee such as expenses for accommodation and study materials.

Free online courses

Get a taste of university-level study on one of York's free short courses, including our subject course, 'Discover the Hidden History of York'.

Teaching Excellence Framework Gold Award

Gold-standard education

Our teaching, learning and student experience is outstanding, recognised by a Gold rating from the Office for Students in the 2023 national assessment (Teaching Excellence Framework).

Why we’re gold-rated

Teaching and assessment

You’ll study and learn with academics who are active researchers, experts in their field and have a passion for their subjects. Our approach to teaching will provide you with the knowledge, opportunities, and support you need to grow and succeed in a global workplace. Find out more about our approach to teaching and learning.

Teaching format

We focus on small-group teaching that is interactive and engaging. This includes lecturers, seminars, discussion groups, specialist workshops and field trips.

Timetabled activities

In your first year, you can expect:

Lectures7 hours per week
Seminars3 hours per week
Workshops3 hours
Practicals0-2 hours per week

These figures are representative of a typical week. Your contact hours will vary throughout the year due to your module choices, non-compulsory classes, exam periods and changes to scheduled activities.

Outside your timetabled hours, you'll study independently. This may include preparation for classes, follow-up work, wider reading, practice completion of assessment tasks, or revision.

In the UK, full-time students are expected to spend 1,200 hours a year learning. That's about 40 hours of classes and independent study each week during semesters. Everyone learns at a different rate, so the number of hours you spend on independent study will be different to other students on your course.

Teaching location

You will be based in both the Department of History and the Department of Economics and Related Studies on Campus West. Your teaching will take place in a variety of locations on Campus West.

About our campus

Our beautiful green campus offers a student-friendly setting in which to live and study, within easy reach of the action in the city centre. It's easy to get around - everything is within walking or pedalling distance, or you can use the fast and frequent bus service. Take a campus tour.

Assessment and feedback

Your first-year work doesn't contribute toward your final marks. We recognise that students are only beginning to develop over the course of their degree. 

From Year 2 onward, formal assessments contribute toward your degree. In your third year, your optional 8,000-word dissertation focuses on a specific topic of your choice.

  • Before formal assessment in many modules, you'll carry out procedural work. You will receive extensive written feedback, which will help you in your formal assessment.
  • Assessments range from research essays, to collaborative projects, to open 'take-home' examinations.
  • Your optional final-year dissertation should be a topic that is interesting to you. Don't be afraid to explore.
Lecture being given to students with focus on lecturer
Group of people stood in front of old buildings

Careers and skills

The History and Economics degree develops skills that are highly valued by employers. Our graduates are adept at engaging in argument and proposing alternative solutions. The mix of abstract thought and quantitative techniques develops excellent technical skills for solving complex problems. 

See what our graduates are doing

Career opportunities

Our graduates have gone on to work in sectors such as:

  • Law
  • Accountancy
  • Banking and investments
  • Teaching
  • Politics, diplomacy and government
  • Finance
  • Commerce and public relations

Transferable skills

You'll graduate with a wide range of transferable skills. These include:

  • critical and analytical thinking
  • pattern recognition and problem solving
  • excellent communication skills
  • time management
  • independent, high-level research skills
  • experience in working with different information types
York is a beautiful city. It’s quite a privilege to spend your days encountering that history, stumbling around incredibly long cobbled streets! I really miss it as a place. That’s why I’ve loved coming back for the past nine years to give talks – it feels like coming full circle.
Greg Jenner, York Alumni
Public Historian & Podcast Host

Entry requirements

Typical offer
A levels

AAA including Mathematics and either History or Classical Civilisation

Access to Higher Education Diploma 39 credits at Distinction including at least 9 credits in History-related units and 9 credits in Mathematics and 6 credits at Merit or higher.
BTEC National Extended Diploma DDD with additional A Levels or equivalent qualifications in either History or Classical Civilisation and Mathematics at grade A.
Cambridge Pre-U D3, D3, D3 including History and Mathematics
European Baccalaureate 85% overall, including 85% in History and 85% in Mathematics
International Baccalaureate 36 points, including 6 at Higher Level in both History and Mathematics (either Analysis and Approaches or Applications and Interpretations).
T levels We are currently not accepting T Levels for this course unless additional A Levels (or equivalent qualifications) in History and Mathematics have been taken.
Scottish Highers / Advanced Highers Advanced Highers - AB in History and Mathematics plus Scottish Highers - AB

We may also be able to consider three Advanced Highers or a combination of Highers and Advanced Highers, where an applicant does not meet the grade requirement through Highers alone. Please contact us to discuss your qualifications.
International foundation programme Foundation Certificate from our International Pathway College or an appropriate alternative.
Other international qualifications Equivalent qualifications from your country

Alternative offers

Meeting the following additional criteria may qualify you for an alternative offer.

Criteria Adjustment
Widening participation If you successfully complete one of the following programmes, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to three A level grades (or equivalent) below our typical offer: Black Access Programme, Next Step York, Realising Opportunities, YESS, YorWay to York. More about widening participation.
Contextual offers If you have experience of local authority care or live in an area with low progression to university, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to two A level grades (or equivalent) below our typical offer. More about contextual offers.
EPQ If you achieve A or higher at EPQ, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to one A level grade (or equivalent) below our typical offer.

English language

If English isn't your first language you may need to provide evidence of your English language ability. We accept the following qualifications:

Minimum requirement
IELTS (Academic) 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component
Cambridge CEFR 176, with a minimum of 169 in each component
Oxford ELLT 7, with a minimum of 6 in each component
Duolingo 120, minimum 105 in each component
GCSE/IGCSE/O level English Language (as a first or second language) Grade C / Grade 4
LanguageCert SELT B2 with a minimum score of 33/50 in each component
LanguageCert Academic B2 Communicator with a minimum score of 33/50 in each component
KITE 459 Main Flight score with 426 in each component
Skills for English B2: Merit overall, with Pass with Merit in each component
PTE Academic 61, with a minimum of 55 in each component
TOEFL 87 overall, with a minimum of 21 in each component
Trinity ISE III Merit in all components

For more information see our undergraduate English language requirements.

If you haven't met our English language requirements

You may be eligible for one of our pre-sessional English language courses. These courses will provide you with the level of English needed to meet the conditions of your offer.

The length of course you need to take depends on your current English language test scores and how much you need to improve to reach our English language requirements.

After you've accepted your offer to study at York, we'll confirm which pre-sessional course you should apply to via You@York.

Applying

To apply to York, you will need to complete an online application via UCAS (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service).

All applications must be made through UCAS. You don't need to know a foreign language, but it may help for some third-year modules.

We encourage mature students to email the Admissions Tutor for consultation and advice. We also consider applications for deferred entry and requests, after taking up an offer, to take a gap year.

Next steps

Contact us

Get in touch if you have any questions

Learn more

Department of Economics and Related Studies, Department of History

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