Development Economics - ECO00006I

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  • Department: Economics and Related Studies
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Giacomo De Luca
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

The module is divided into four parts, each part having its own specific aims and objectives:
Part One: is designed to introduce students to a) overall problems of development and b) to classical and new theories on economic growth and development
Part Two: is designed to introduce students to domestic problems and policy issues facing developing economies
Part Three: is designed to introduce students to those international problems and policy issues which affect the economic growth and development of so many countries in the world today
Part Four: brings the module together with one overview lecture which is also designed to guide and inform work on the exam

Module learning outcomes

On completing the module, a student should have:

  • A greater appreciation of the insights provided by a range of classical and new theories of economic growth and development - and of the long run forces which have determined the relative economic growth of developing economies
  • A greater appreciation of how and why a range of inter-linking and mutually reinforcing domestic problems such as corruption, conflict and geographical issues may constrain the growth and development of many economies
  • A greater appreciation of how and why institutions matter in terms of development and relative long run economic growth and development
  • A greater appreciation of how and why a range of inter-linking and mutually reinforcing international problems have affected the growth and development of many economies
  • Page last updated: 04 February 2015
  • Acquired important transferable skills via familiarity with key international web sites (United Nations Development Programme, World Bank, Transparency International, Global Competitiveness Forum, IMF etc) in both quantitative and qualitative materials
  • Acquired important transferable skills in terms of experience in participating and leading team based work.
  • Acquired important transferable skills in terms of using information to answer essay based questions.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Development Economics
2 hours 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Development Economics
2 hours 100

Module feedback

Information currently unavailable

Indicative reading

Collier, P. (2007). The Bottom Billion; Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It. Oxford University Press.
Clunies-Ross, Anthony et. Al., Development Economics, McGraw Hill, 2009.
Easterly, W. (2001). The Elusive Quest for Growth. G 8.91 EAS.
Perkins, D H., Radelet, S. and Lindauer, D L. (2006). Economics of Development. 6th ed.
Ray, D. (1998). Development Economics. New Jersey: Princeton. G 8.9 RAY.
Sachs, J. (2005). The End of Poverty. Penguin. G 9.46 SAC.
Todaro, M P. & Smith, S C. (2009). Economic Development. 10th ed, Essex: Pearson..



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.