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Systems & Devices 4: Networking - COM00034H

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  • Department: Computer Science
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Mike Freeman
  • Credit value: 10 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2021-22
    • See module specification for other years: 2022-23

Module summary

This module introduces students to the core concepts of computer networking.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2021-22

Module aims

This module introduces students to the core concepts of computer networking. It starts by covering the layered network model and discusses the utility and motivation for such an approach. Services that are layered on this model (such as UNIX sockets, DNS, TCP, IP) are detailed and students will develop software to experiment with these features. After taking this module, students will have an understanding of how all kinds of computer networks, including the Internet, are created.

Module learning outcomes

  • Be able to articulate the motivation behind the layered network model

  • Develop software using OS-level networking concepts (i.e. sockets) to communicate with other systems.

  • Demonstrate understanding of networked architectures, how they are integrated into an operating system, and develop simple applications using this knowledge.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Systems & Devices 4
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

Feedback is provided through work in practical sessions, and after the final assessment as per normal University guidelines.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Systems & Devices 4
N/A 100

Module feedback

Feedback is provided through work in practical sessions, and after the final assessment as per normal University guidelines.

Indicative reading

Kevin R Fall, W Richard Stevens, TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The protocols, Addison Wesley, 2012
Andrew Tannenbaum, Computer Networks, Prentice Hall, 2002



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.