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Assessed Seminars: Sustainable Heritage - ARC00045H

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  • Department: Archaeology
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Louise Cooke
  • Credit value: 40 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2021-22

Module summary

This module will introduce students to the debates around the future of heritage in relation to the climate crisis. We will look at the intended and unintended consequences of change for heritage, and the role of adaptation, mitigation and resilience for heritage assets and the communities who value them.

Students enjoy developing their own topic relating to the broad field of sustainable heritage ranging from coastal change, intangible heritage, the role of digital heritage, retrofit and many others with a UK or international focus.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2021-22 to Summer Term 2021-22

Module aims

Assessed Seminars seek to develop an understanding of a specialist topic (particularly a critical understanding of the key themes, approaches and opinions). In doing so students should be able to improve their knowledge of the subject area (through reading and preparation for their own seminar, their seminar contributions and involvement in the seminars) and also have the opportunity to develop their skills in chairing a seminar, presenting material and being involved in discussion (including thinking on their feet about the topic being discussed, how to engage interest in the topic and stimulate debate).

Specifically this module aims to:

  • To introduce the key debates and issues around planning for climate change and its direct and indirect impacts on the historic environment

  • To raise awareness of the intersection of policy and practice for sustainability on the conservation of the heritage assets and their contexts

  • To engage critically with contested areas of thinking and environmental action in relation to the long term protection of the historic environment and public engagement with its conservation.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate that they are familiar with the literature and information sources for the direct and indirect effects of climate change for the historic environment and sustainability, including contested areas of policy and practice

  • exhibit a firm understanding of the theoretical, methodological and ethical issues related to conservation of heritage assets and their contexts, in relation to climate change impacts and concepts of sustainability

  • show familiarity with a range of case studies

  • demonstrate in depth knowledge of a topic of their choosing

  • pick out the key issues in their chosen topic

  • prepare a worksheet which sets out key reading and issues for presentation, debate and discussion, and support the group in the preparation of the seminar

  • chair a seminar, engage interest in the topic, stimulate debate and structure discussion

  • have a critical awareness of the process of collective debate on a specific topic

  • be able to judge the general 'success' of the seminar, and to be able to reflect on this, through a written summary of a seminar

  • present on other subjects within the general theme and contribute informed ideas and information to the other seminars

Module content

Sustainable heritage is an exciting and fast changing area of policy and practice developing in line with international obligations under the Paris Climate Change Agreement and new ideas around Zero-Carbon living and the circular economy (amongst others).

This module will introduce the key debates around heritage in relation to the climate crisis. We will look at the intended and unintended consequences of change for heritage, and the role of adaptation, mitigation and resilience for heritage assets and the communities who value them.

Case studies provide material for exploring the issues raised by the conservation of landscapes, archaeological sites and historic buildings. Challenges include a rapidly-changing policy position, perceptions of risk and benefit, and the difficulties of influencing social and individual behaviours.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Critique
N/A 15
Essay/coursework
Seminar Contribution
N/A 5
Essay/coursework
Seminar Worksheet
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Chaired Seminar
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 1
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 2
N/A 20

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
N/A 20
Essay/coursework
Critique
N/A 20
Essay/coursework
Short report on best practice in chairing
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 1
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 2
N/A 20

Module feedback

Formative: There will be group discussions and opportunities for one-to-one feedback as you prepare for your summative assessments.

Summative: Assessed Seminar modules are exempt from the University's Policy on Feedback Turnaround Time owing to the nature of this assessment (in that the seminar performance is the subject of your critique). Marks for all elements of the assessment will be uploaded to your e:vision account (your personal University of York online services account) within four weeks of submission of the final reflective critique.

Indicative reading

Avrami, E, Macdonald, S, Mason, R and Myers, D. (2019). Values in Heritage Management: Emerging Approaches and Research Directions. Getty Conservation Institute.

Harvey, D & Perry J (eds). 2015. The Future of Heritage as Climates Change: Loss, Adaptation and Creativity. Routledge, Key Issues in Cultural Heritage Series.

Historic England (2019) Heritage Counts 2019 - There's No Place Like Old Homes: Re-Use and Recycle to Reduce Carbon https://historicengland.org.uk/research/heritage-counts/2019-carbon-in-built-environment/carbon-in-built-historic-environment/

Detailed reading for the module will be available via YorkShare (the University's virtual learning environment). When you have enrolled on a module, you will be able to access the full reading list.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.