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Research Methods for Global Development - POL00010C

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  • Department: Politics
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Eleanor Jew
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: C
  • Academic year of delivery: 2020-21

Module summary

This Module evaluates and explores a range of different research methods for development, both quantitative and qualitative. While the module exposes students to the methodological debates in global development, it also offers hands on experience with data analyses and qualitative interviews to provide a basic understanding of approaches to research design in the study of global development.

Professional requirements

No professional requirements.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2020-21 to Summer Term 2020-21

Module aims

The module aims to:

  • Encourage students to think critically about the claims and arguments that are made about global development phenomena within academia and beyond;
  • Develop awareness of the processes involved in generating new knowledge and making an argument about global development issues. 
  • Develop confidence and independence as scholars, both within the undergraduate degree and after graduation;
  • Begin to prepare students for a research by giving them the skills and confidence to design and carry out a piece of independent research.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, the module students will be able to: 1) Understand the basic methods of qualitative and quantitative research and their strengths and weaknesses in different contexts, 2) Have a basic understanding of approaches to research design and methodological approaches in the study of Global Development, 3) Obtain a basic understanding of how to apply and adapt analysis of quantitative and qualititative data, and identify appropriate theoretical and practical perspectives.

Module content

In the first term the students will be introduced to the reasoning behind methodological approaches to Global Development within various disciplines and traditions and some important methodological debates. In the second term they will focus on qualitative and quantitative methods. Students will design an interview and learn the basics of statistical analysis.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Independent Research Project
N/A 40
Practical
Practical Exercise
N/A 40
University - closed examination
Exam
2 hours 20

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

If a student fails any assessment of the module, they will be able to re-do the assignments in the summer re-assessment week.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Independent Research Project
N/A 40
Practical
Practical Exercise
N/A 40
University - closed examination
Exam
2 hours 20

Module feedback

Students will receive timely written feedback on their formative and summative assessment. They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s feedback and guidance hours.

Students will receive written feedback on their summative assessment no later than 20 working days after submission/presentation; and the module tutor will hold a specific session to discuss feedback, which students can also opt to attend. They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s regular feedback and guidance hours

Indicative reading

Crawford, Gordon, Lena Kruckenberg, Nicholas Loubere, Rosemary Morgan. 2017. Understanding Global Development Research - Fieldwork Issues, Experiences and Reflections. SAGE Publications Ltd

Duvendack, Maren, Richard Palmer-Jones and Laura Camfield. 2016. Impact Evaluation for International Development: The Essential Guide. Routledge Textbooks in Development Economics.

May, T. 2003. Social Research: Issues, Methods and Process. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Montgomerie, Johnna (ed). 2018. Critical Methods in Political and Cultural Economy. Routledge



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): changes to courses

The 2020/21 academic year will start in September. We aim to deliver as much face-to-face teaching as we can, supported by high quality online alternatives where we must.

Find details of the measures we're planning to protect our community.

Course changes for new students