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Reading Philosophy - PHI00074M

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  • Department: Philosophy
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. David Ingram
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2021-22

Module summary

This module will explore one key contemporary or historical philosophical text over the course of a term. Texts can vary each year depending upon the research interests of the faculty member leading the module, but the text will always be a significant work that will benefit from close study.

 

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2021-22

Module aims

The module is designed (i) to guide postgraduate students through the close reading of a rich and rewarding text, (ii) to encourage students to engage philosophically in a sustained way with one text and to offer their own critical reflections, and (iii) to enhance philosophical skills of close reading, argument and debate through seminar discussion and written work. (Though seminar work will focus on one text, students will be expected to explore related work, including responses to the text, to understand the main text in its intellectual context.)

Module learning outcomes

  • By the end of this module, students should be able to display an in-depth and systematic understanding of one core philosophical text, and the key topics presented and discussed within it, as well as a grasp of the forefront of current research in the area through some independent engagement with related secondary sources, which will provide a solid grounding for further independent research on related topics.
  • By the end of this module, students will have developed better skills of close reading and should be able to analyse complex texts in detail and depth. And, students will show the ability to work independently and self-critically on an extended essay that goes beyond the core framework that is provided in seminars.

 

Module content

For 2021/22, the text to be studied is David Lewis’s On the Plurality of Worlds (1986).

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 4000 words
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

The 1,000-word formative essay plan is due on Wednesday, Week 9 of the Autumn Term.

The 4,000-word summative essay is due on Monday, Week 1 of the Spring Term.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 4000 words
N/A 100

Module feedback

Students will receive feedback on formative work before the end of term.

Students will receive feedback on their summative work 4 weeks after submission. 

Indicative reading

Texts can vary each year depending upon the research interests of the faculty member leading the module, but the text will always be a significant work that will benefit from close study. Indicative texts are:

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (Wittgenstein)

Intention (Anscombe)

Reasons and Persons (Parfit)

Naming and Necessity (Kripke)

On the Plurality of Worlds (Lewis)

 



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.