Philosophy of Christianity - PHI00058H

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  • Department: Philosophy
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. David Efird
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module summary

This module examines the implications and beliefs of a range of Christian doctrines which have philosophical importance.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20

Module aims

  • to develop students' abilities to apply philosophical tools and techniques in order to advance understanding of intellectual problems.
  • to apply contemporary, analytic philosophy to theology in order:
  1. to explicate theological doctrines,
  2. to identify the philosophical problems those doctrines give rise to,
  3. to identify solutions to those problems, and
  4. to evaluate those solutions.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content

  • to explain the doctrines of Scripture, the Trinity, Providence, Original Sin, the Incarnation, the Atonement, the Resurrection of the Body, the Life Everlasting, and the Eucharist
  • to explain various interpretations of these doctrines, e.g. the kenotic interpretation of the Incarnation,
  • to evaluate these interpretations relative to one another, and
  • to select the best interpretation(s).

Academic and graduate skills

  • to be able to engage critically with a wide range of philosophico-theological material and to develop their own, considered view on that material.

Module content

This module examines the implications and beliefs of a range of Christian doctrines which have philosophical importance. These include the doctrines of Scripture (that the Bible is authoritative and inspired by God), the Trinity (there is one God who exists in three persons), Providence (that God has a plan for humanity and for the world), Original Sin (that humans are guilty of sin from birth and created such that they will inevitably sin), the Incarnation (that Jesus is both human and divine), the Atonement (that the death of Jesus reconciles humanity to God), the Resurrection of the Body (that we will be raised bodily from the dead), the Life Everlasting (that there is an eternal, conscious afterlife consisting of life in either Heaven or Hell), and the Eucharist (that the consecrated bread is the Body of Christ and the consecrated wine the Blood of Christ, respectively).

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

Students will receive feedback on the 1500-word formative essay two weeks after they submit it.

Students will receive feedback on the essay plan one week after they submit it.

Students will receive feedback on the 4000-word summative assessment and re-assessment six weeks after they submit it.

Indicative reading

Oliver Crisp (ed), A Reader in Contemporary Philosophical Theology (New York: Continuum, 2009).

Michael Rea (ed), Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology, Volume I: Trinity, Incarnation, Atonement (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).

Michael Rea (ed), Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology, Volume II: Providence, Scripture, and Resurrection (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.