Teaching Techniques - MUS00075M

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  • Department: Music
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Liz Haddon
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module summary

This module develops understanding of teaching styles, learner motivation and the development of expertise, particularly in relation to the intermediate learner.  It develops research skills through further examination of a range of written and online material.

Related modules

Pre-requisite modules

Co-requisite modules

  • None

Prohibited combinations

  • None

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2019-20

Module aims

This module builds on material presented in Term 1 and will extend knowledge, understanding, and research skills. It develops understanding of teaching styles, learner motivation and the development of expertise, particularly in relation to the intermediate learner, placed in transition from beginner to advanced learner. The module facilitates understanding of research relating to healthy physical and vocal practice, and the development and teaching of instrumental/vocal practising skills,  sight-reading, improvisation, composition, scales, technique and repertoire, and using technology in teaching. It develops research skills through further examination of a range of written and online material, particularly in relation to comparative review.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content:

On completion of this module students will be able to:

  • On completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Identify key factors relating to musicians’ health and understand their relevance to instrumental/vocal teaching

  • Delineate strategies for productive instrumental/vocal practice

  • Articulate understanding of the development of expertise

  • Detail theoretical knowledge of learner motivation

  • Detail approaches to the teaching of sight-reading

  • Identify strategies for developing skills in improvisation and composition

  • Articulate understanding of teaching skills for expression

  • Demonstrate understanding of the use of technology in instrumental/vocal teaching

Academic and graduate skills:

  • Demonstrate structured understanding of recent research in the subject, the ability to convey ideas with clarity, to engage in comparative critique, to detail, synthesise and explore concepts

  • Develop the quality of academic work through focused, concise writing with use of appropriate resources

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Comparative Review
N/A 25
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 75

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Comparative Review
N/A 25
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 75

Module feedback

Students will receive feedback on all submitted work within 20 working days of submission. It will be delivered in a written report with additional annotations on a copy of the work.

Indicative reading

Hallam, S. (1995). Professional musicians’ orientations to practice: Implications for teaching. British Journal of Music Education, 12(1), 3-19.

Hallam, S. (1998). Using information technology (Chapter 15). Instrumental teaching: A guide to better teaching and learning (pp. 305-316). Oxford: Heinemann.

King, A., Prior, H., & Waddington-Jones, C. (2019). Exploring teachers’ and pupils’ behaviour in online and face-to-face instrumental lessons. Music Education Research, 21(2), 197-209.

Krampe, R. T., & Ericsson, K. A. (1995). Deliberate practice and elite musical performance. In J. Rink (Ed.), The practice of performance: Studies in musical interpretation (pp. 84-102). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

McPherson, G. E., & Renwick, J. M. (2001). A longitudinal study of self-regulation in children’s musical practice. Music Education Research, 3(2), 169-186.

Norton, N. C. (2019). Human, professional, musician, educator, ally of prevention: Your health matters. American Music Teacher, 68(6), 14-17.

O’Neill, S., & McPherson, G. E. (2002). Motivation. In R. Parncutt & G. E. McPherson (Eds.), The science and psychology of music performance: Creative strategies for teaching and learning (pp.31-46). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Pike, P. (2017). Self-regulation of teenaged pianists during at-home practice. Music Education Research, 45(5), 739-751.

Pike, P. (2017). Exploring self-regulation through a reflective practicum: A case study of improvement through mindful piano practice. Music Education Research, 19(4),398-409.

Pitts, S., Davidson, J., & McPherson, G. E. (2000). Developing effective practise strategies: Case studies of three young instrumentalists. Music Education Research, 2(1), 45-56.

Renwick, J. M., & McPherson, G. E. (2002). Interest and choice: Student-selected repertoire and its effects on practising behaviour. British Journal of Music Education, 19(2), 173-188.

 

 



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.