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Filming the Nation: Cinematic Representations of Modern Italy - LAN00038I

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  • Department: Language and Linguistic Science
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Lucia Aiello
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2024-25

Module summary

From the post-World War II period to the present, Italian cinema has played a significant role in describing the dynamics and transformation of Italian society and, to a certain extent, in shaping collective and often conflicting narratives of national identity. This module, conducted in Italian, explores key themes in modern Italian history and society and analyses how these themes are negotiated in post-war and contemporary Italian films.

Related modules

Pre-requisite: Understanding Italian-speaking Cultures and Societies.

Open as an elective for students with equivalent level in Italian.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching period
A Semester 2 2024-25

Module aims

The aims of this module are:

  • to increase students’ awareness of key themes in modern Italian history, and the cultures and societies of the Italian-speaking world;

  • to provide an understanding of the role of post-war Italian cinema in the shaping of modern and contemporary Italian identities;

  • To develop students’ critical skills and enhance their ability to research, analyse, and discuss a variety of topics in Italian.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module students should demonstrate:

  • a knowledge and understanding of the key themes and films;

  • an ability to analyse the cinematic narratives in relation to the key themes discussed;

  • an ability to articulate views and defend positions in Italian;

  • a good level of accuracy in the production of both written and spoken Italian;

  • a good level of fluency and communicative skills in Italian.

Module content

From the post-World War II period to the present, Italian cinema has played a significant role in describing the dynamics and transformation of Italian society and, to a certain extent, in shaping collective and often conflicting narratives of national and transnational identities. This module, conducted in Italian, explores key themes in modern Italian history and society and analyses how these themes are negotiated in post-war and contemporary Italian films. Key themes may include but not be limited to: Italian Risorgimento, Fascism and Resistance, the ‘Southern Question’, old and new migrations, transnational encounters, gender and social change, the world of labour. For each theme, two films will be used to describe traditional and contemporary approaches to the issues discussed. Reference will be made also to the historical and cultural context, analysed through a selection of key texts.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 60
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation
N/A 40

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 60
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation
N/A 40

Module feedback

Feedback on formative tasks will be given in wk 5. Feedback on summative assessment will be returned according to the feedback turnaround time.

Indicative reading

A full reading list will be provided by the tutor. The selection of key texts will be based on the key themes discussed in the module.

Extracts from the following texts on the role and history of Italian cinema will be added to the theme-based reading lists:

  • Gian Piero Brunetta, Guida alla storia del cinema italiano (Einaudi, 2003).

  • Gian Piero Brunetta, Il cinema italiano contemporaneo: Da “La dolce vita” a “Centochiodi” (Laterza, 2007)

  • Vito Zagarrio, La meglio gioventù: nuovo cinema italiano 2000-2006 (Marsilio, 2006)



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.