Food, Space, Culture & Society - ENV00023I

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  • Department: Environment and Geography
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Samarthia Thankappan
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module summary

The module contextualises sustainable food consumption by broadly examining the concepts of sustainability and sustainable consumption. This course evaluates and critiques the prevailing food system by exploring its inherent consequences and contradictions. The emergence and rise of alternative modes of food provisioning and the various manifestations of the ‘alternative’ or ‘sustainable’ food system are examined in this module, particularly their nature, potential and any barriers to their acceptance and growth. The module also examines the roles of society, policy and governance, and technology in shaping the food system

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

This module explores sustainable food consumption as an incipient yet fundamental field of environmental planning, agri-technologies and social science. The module contextualises sustainable food consumption by broadly examining the concepts of sustainability and sustainable consumption. Part of this course evaluates and critiques the prevailing food system by exploring its inherent consequences and contradictions. The emergence and rise of alternative modes of food provisioning and the various manifestations of the ‘alternative’ or ‘sustainable’ food system are examined in the second part of this module, particularly their nature, potential and any barriers to their acceptance and growth. The module also examines the roles of society, policy and governance, and technology in shaping the food system and facilitating the move towards food consumption patterns which are sustainable ecologically, economically and socially.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module, you should be able to:

  • Critically discuss key issues in the study of sustainability and sustainable consumption.
  • Understand, critique and apply a range of geographical concepts and discourse to the sustainable food consumption debate.
  • Critically discuss key issues in the study of sustainability and sustainable consumption.
  • Evaluate the impact of (un)sustainable food consumption practices on economic, social and environmental geographies
  • Undertake analysis of complex and contradictory areas of knowledge allowing for the critical evaluation of arguments, assumptions and abstractions, to make correct judgments, to frame and successfully solve a problem and be able to communicate the outcome effectively

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
2000 word Essay
N/A 50
University - closed examination
Food, Space, Culture & Society
1.5 hours 50

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Reassessment: 2000 word Essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

Feedback on group tasks during seminars is provided as verbal comments after each session. Feedback on individual coursework (essay) is provided as written comments on returned work and a dedicated feedback session will be held.

Examination scripts are made available to students in a dedicated session with the course lecturers available for one-to-one discussion. This allows identification of any points for improvement in future examinations.

Indicative reading

Cloke, Paul J. (2005).Introducing human geographies.

Hodder Arnold Steger, Manfred B. (2009). Globalisation. Oxford University Press

Gabaccia, Donna R. (2000).We are what we eat. Harvard University Press

Atkins, P. J. (2001). Food in Society. Arnold



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.