This event has now finished.
  • Date and time: Tuesday 10 December 2019, 9am to Wednesday 11 December 2019, 5pm
  • Location: York Plasma Institute
  • Booking:

Event details

Low-temperature (Cold) plasmas are a non-thermal, non-ablative technology. They are produced through electrically energising a gas, to generate a rich reactive chemistry e.g. reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), combined with charge, electric fields and photons. Low-temperature plasma generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are the same as those produced endogenously in the body and used to mediate many different processes and signaling mechanisms. Therefore, the plasma produced species can mimic their endogenous counterparts stimulating specific biological response pathways including for example cytotoxicity, immunogenicity and cell proliferation. Applications can be expected in the fields of cancer therapy, antimicrobials, wound healing, biotechnology, agriculture and food. The workshop will explore the fundamental underlying processes required to progress this technology, including innovative techniques and methods to investigate these. This requires expertise from multiple disciplines, including physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, engineering, industry and clinicians.

Who should attend

We invite participation from academic, industrial and clinical research scientists with an interest in contributing to the development of plasma biomedical science and technology. The workshop aims to bridge gaps in our understanding and promote collaborations across the various disciplines.

Workshop Organisers

Deborah O’Connell (University of York)

Paul Maguire (Ulster University)

Declan Diver (Glasgow University)

Invited Speakers

Brendan Gilmore, Queen’s University Belfast

Fiona Frame, University of Hull

Paula Bourke, Technological University Dublin

Rob Short, University of Lancaster

Cristina Canal, UPC Barcelona

Andrew Gibson, Ruhr University Bochum

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Contact us

Professor Mark Leake
Coordinator of Physics of Life Group
mark.leake@york.ac.uk
@PhysLifeYork