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PGT Dissertation - SOC00009M

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  • Department: Sociology
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Jennifer Chubb
  • Credit value: 60 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2024-25
  • Notes: This is an independent study module

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching period
A Semester 2 2024-25 to Summer Semester 2024-25

Module aims

  1. Apply appropriate methodological, conceptual and analytical skills to an independent research project
  2. Design, implement and manage an extended independent research project.
  3. Produce a well-structured, clearly written, and analytically robust research project

Module learning outcomes

  • Design and formulate appropriate research questions and a project that answers it.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the broader intellectual and disciplinary context of their research, by critically evaluating existing literature
  • Articulate the relevance of your research to conceptual, theoretical and/or epistemological debates within sociology or, if relevant, to the wider social sciences.
  • Where empirical research is conducted, demonstrate a critical understanding of research ethics and an ability to collect and evaluate qualitative or quantitative data.
  • Demonstrate an ability to independently manage a project over an extended period of time.
  • Communicate research findings clearly in an organised manner, following academic and stylistic conventions

Module content

Workshops will run on the following topics:

  1. Starting a dissertation and choosing a research question
  2. The conceptual framework
  3. The literature review
  4. Doing ethical research (empirical research)
  5. Doing ethical research (desktop-based research)
  6. Practical workshop (lab-based): doing ethical research
  7. Methods
  8. Analysis

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Dissertation
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

None

Module feedback

Written feedback on the dissertation provided at the end of the Summer semester marking period.

Indicative reading

Biggam J, Succeeding with Your Master’s Dissertation : A Step-by-Step Handbook (Fourth edition, McGraw-Hill 2018)

Furseth I, Doing Your Master’s Dissertation (Euris Larry Everett ed, Sage 2013)

Hart C, Doing Your Masters Dissertation : Realizing Your Potential as a Social Scientist (SAGE 2005)

Day T, Success in Academic Writing (Palgrave Macmillan 2013)

Zemach DE, Academic Writing : From Paragraph to Essay (Macmillan 2005)

Shon PC, The Quick Fix Guide to Academic Writing : How to Avoid Big Mistakes and Small Errors (First edition, SAGE 2018)

Bailey S, Academic Writing : A Handbook for International Students (3rd ed., Routledge 2011) Go to item Osmond A, Academic Writing and Grammar for Students (2nd ed., SAGE 2016)

Balmer AS, The Craft of Writing in Sociology : Developing the Argument in Undergraduate Essays and Dissertations (Anne Murcott ed, Manchester University Press 2017)

Richlin-Klonsky Judith, Strenski E and Giarrusso Roseann (eds), A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers (5th ed., Worth Publishers 2001)

Becker HS, Writing for Social Scientists : How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article (University of Chicago Press 1986)



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.