Perception & Cognition I - PSY00003C

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  • Department: Psychology
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Nick Barraclough
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: C
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Spring Term 2019-20

Module aims

This module discusses the processes through which our primary senses (vision and hearing) gain and interpret information about our world and how this information is organised, stored in, and retrieved from, memory.

Module learning outcomes

  • Describe the physiology of the eye and the early parts of the visual system and understand how these determine our perception of the world.
  • Have an understanding of the properties of sound and how it leads to the perception of loudness, pitch, timbre and perceived location
  • Give an account of the variety of methods that have been used in the study of cognition
  • Describe the theoretical approaches to, and empirical methods for, the investigation of human memory

Module content

In Year 1 we investigate the processes through which our primary senses (vision and hearing) gain and interpret information about our world and how this information is organised, stored in, and retrieved from, memory.

  • TB1: Hearing
  • TB2: Vision
  • TB3: Cognition
  • TB4: Human Memory

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
1650 Word Essay
N/A 25
University - closed examination
Perception & Cognition I (Paper 1)
1 hours 37.5
University - closed examination
Perception & Cognition I (Paper 2)
1 hours 37.5

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
1650 Word Essay
N/A 25
University - closed examination
Perception & Cognition I (Paper 1)
1 hours 37.5
University - closed examination
Perception & Cognition I (Paper 2)
1 hours 37.5

Module feedback

The marks on all assessed work will be provided on e-vision.

Indicative reading

Baddeley, A., Eysenck, M.W., Anderson, M.C. (2015) Memory, Psychology Press, Taylor & Francis Group

Basic Vision: an introduction to visual perception. Snowden, R. Thompson, P. & Troscianko T. (2012) Oxford University Press

Cognitive Psychology. Quinlan, P. & Dyson, B. (2008) Pearson



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.