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The Politics of (Post-)Colonialism - POL00060H

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  • Department: Politics
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Sara De Jong
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2021-22

Module summary

This module traverses through the politics of colonialism across different regions and considers the implications for contemporary post-colonial politics and international relations, including conflict, development, and migration.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2021-22

Module aims

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of how the politics of colonialism across different regions continues to shape the contemporary order and be equipped with a range of conceptual tools drawing from postcolonial and decolonial theories.

This module challenges colonial amnesia and traverses through the politics of colonialism across different regions, considering the implications for contemporary post-colonial politics and international relations. This module will equip students with an advanced understanding of how the politics in the colonial metropole and the periphery are intertwined. We will discuss the enduring legacies of colonialism for international and domestic politics in relation to international development, migration, climate (in)justice, war and violence, racism, and European integration.

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of how the politics of colonialism across different regions continues to shape the contemporary order and be equipped with a range of conceptual tools drawing from postcolonial and decolonial theories.

This module challenges colonial amnesia and traverses through the politics of colonialism across different regions, considering the implications for contemporary post-colonial politics and international relations. This module will equip students with an advanced understanding of how the politics in the colonial metropole and the periphery are intertwined. We will discuss the enduring legacies of colonialism for international and domestic politics in relation to international development, migration, climate (in)justice, war and violence, racism, and European integration.

Module learning outcomes

At the end of this module, students will be able to:

- Demonstrate specialist knowledge of the relations between historical dynamics rooted in colonialism and the contemporary global political order;

- Independently apply and critically evaluate advanced theoretical approaches in relation to colonial politics and its postcolonial continuities;

- Demonstrate a reflective approach to knowledge production and the use of alternative epistemologies from the South; and to show awareness of the relation between colonial power and knowledge production.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 3000 words
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 3000 words
N/A 100

Module feedback

Students will receive written timely feedback on their formative assessment.  They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s feedback and guidance hours.

Students will receive written feedback on their summative assessment no later than 20 working days; and the module tutor will hold a specific session to discuss feedback, which students can also opt to attend.  They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s regular feedback and guidance hours.

Indicative reading

Barkawi, Tarak. "Decolonizing war." European Journal of International Security 1.2 (2016): 199-214.

Gildea, R. (2019). Empires of the mind: The colonial past and the politics of the present. Cambridge University Press.

Loomba, A. (2015). Colonialism/postcolonialism. Routledge.

Rutazibwa, O. U., & Shilliam, R. (Eds.). (2018). Routledge handbook of postcolonial politics. Routledge.

Whyte, K. P. (2016). 7 Is it colonial déjà vu?. Indigenous Peoples and Climate Injustice.” Humanities for the Environment: Integrating Knowledge, Forging New Constellations of Practice, 88-104.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.