Accessibility statement

Gender, War & Militarism - POL00056H

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  • Department: Politics
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Sara De Jong
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2020-21
    • See module specification for other years: 2019-20

Module summary

Gender, militarism, and war are deeply interrelated social constructions which are informed by and enacted through one another. In this course, gender is positioned both as a topic of study and as an analytical lens; and this dual approach enables us to ask different - and, perhaps, more comprehensive - questions about the nature and the practice of war. We will explore key feminist claims about the gendered logics which delineate how some threats but not others come to be recognised as relevant to ‘security’, about the mutual imbrication of militarism and masculinities, and about the impossibility of disentangling ‘the personal’ from ‘the political.’ Topics will include the gendered logics of nation and nationalism; feminist security studies; the position of women and men in military institutions; the gendering of violence and of victimisation in war; everyday experiences of war; questioning the war/peace divide; and the place of women and men in peace processes. The course will draw on work from feminist post-colonial theory and from queer studies to explore how gendered experiences of war and militarism, and the gendered logics which underpin these violent social institutions, are shaped by multiple intersecting axes of identity and oppression, in particular race and sexuality.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2020-21

Module aims

Gender, militarism, and war are deeply interrelated social constructions which are informed by and enacted through one another. In this course, gender is positioned both as a topic of study and as an analytical lens; and this dual approach enables us to ask different - and, perhaps, more comprehensive - questions about the nature and the practice of war. We will explore key feminist claims about the gendered logics which delineate how some threats but not others come to be recognised as relevant to ‘security’, about the mutual imbrication of militarism and masculinities, and about the impossibility of disentangling ‘the personal’ from ‘the political.’ Topics will include the gendered logics of nation and nationalism; feminist security studies; the position of women and men in military institutions; the gendering of violence and of victimisation in war; everyday experiences of war; and a questioning of the war/peace divide. The course will draw on work from feminist post-colonial theory and from queer studies to explore how gendered experiences of war and militarism, and the gendered logics which underpin these violent social institutions, are shaped by multiple intersecting axes of identity and oppression, in particular, race and sexuality.

Module learning outcomes

Upon completing this module, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of feminist analyses of the interrelationships between gender, war, and militarism.
  • Describe and interpret the multiple roles which women and men play in armed conflict.
  • Critically analyse global structures and events relevant to war and militarism through a gender lens.

This module will also equip students with a range of key transferable skills:

  • Collection, synthesis, and use of evidence and argumentation from a range of secondary sources;
  • Verbal and written argumentation;
  • Critical appraisal of concepts.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
3000 word essay
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
3000 word essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

Students will receive written timely feedback on their formative assessment.  They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s feedback and guidance hours.

Students will receive written feedback on their summative assessment no later than 20 working days; and the module tutor will hold a specific session to discuss feedback, which students can also opt to attend.  They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s regular feedback and guidance hours.

Indicative reading

Enloe, Cynthia. 2000. Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarising Women’s Lives. Berkley and London: University of California Press.

Eriksson Baaz, Maria, and Maria Stern. 2013. Sexual Violence as a Weapon of War? Perceptions, Prescriptions, Problems in the Congo and Beyond. London and New York: Zed Books.

Parashar, Swati. 2014. Women and Militant Wars: The Politics of Injury. Oxon and New York: Routledge.

Shepherd, Laura J. (ed).2015.  Gender Matters in Global Politics: A Feminist Introduction to International Relations. London and New York: Routledge.

Sjoberg, Laura (ed). 2010. Gender and International Security: Feminist Perspectives. Oxon and New York: Routledge.

Sylvester, Christine. 2013. War as Experience: Contributions from International Relations and Feminist Analysis. Oxon and New York: Routledge.

Yuval-Davis, Nira. 1997. Gender and Nation. London: Sage



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): changes to courses

The 2020/21 academic year will start in September. We aim to deliver as much face-to-face teaching as we can, supported by high quality online alternatives where we must.

Find details of the measures we're planning to protect our community.

Course changes for new students