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Global Political Economy - POL00052I

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  • Department: Politics
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Jappe Eckhardt
  • Credit value: 30 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2020-21
    • See module specification for other years: 2019-20

Module summary

In Global Political Economy, you will build an excellent knowledge and understanding of international economic relations through engagement with key questions that have formed the basis of the discipline historically and that continue to shape our understanding of contemporary phenomena such as the election of Trump, the rise of China and the globalisation backlash.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2020-21 to Summer Term 2020-21

Module aims

The module begins by building a conceptual framework – examining the role of power, interests, institutions and ideas – for answering the key questions posed by the contemporary global political economy. It then moves on to examine four central questions in turn: Do we need a hegemonic power to support an open global economy? Who are the winners and losers of economic globalisation? How is the governance of the global economy changing? What drives state responses to the global economy? By bringing together existing academic literature and analysis of relevant cases, students will develop critical, compelling and conceptually rigorous ways to answer these questions.

Module learning outcomes

Upon completion of Global Political Economy, students should:

  • Demonstrate detailed knowledge of key issues and concepts in Global Political Economy through engagement with core questions from the discipline.
  • Apply with minimal guidance concepts – including power, interests, institutions, ideas – and empirical evidence to problems and issues in Global Political Economy
  • Gather and analyse information in response to questions about Global Political Economy and work to set goals and objectives in order to complete assigned tasks
  • Communicate to present arguments using detailed ideas through media including essays and exam answers

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 40
Online Exam
Global Political Economy
N/A 60

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

There are two pieces of formative assessment.

 

In Week 7 of Autumn Term, students submit a short outline essay question response. Feedback is received and discussed by the end of Autumn Term, to support students towards improving the quality of their summative essay performance (submitted Week 1 Spring Term).

 

In Week 10 of Spring Term, students submit a response to a sample exam question (completed in private study time under exam conditions). Feedback is received and discussed at the start of Summer Term, to support students towards improving the quality of their summative exam performance.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 40
Online Exam
Global Political Economy
N/A 60

Module feedback

Students will receive written timely feedback on their formative assessment.  They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s feedback and guidance hours.

Students will receive written feedback on their summative assessment no later than six weeks after submission; and the module tutor will hold a specific session to discuss feedback, which students can also opt to attend.  They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor’s regular feedback and guidance hours.

Indicative reading

Ravenhill, J. ed. 2016. Global Political Economy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Paul, D. E. and Amawi, A., eds., 2013. The Theoretical Evolution of International Political Economy: A Reader. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

O'Brien, R. and Williams, M., 2016. Global Political Economy: Evolution & Dynamics. 5th ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): changes to courses

The 2020/21 academic year will start in September. We aim to deliver as much face-to-face teaching as we can, supported by high quality online alternatives where we must.

Find details of the measures we're planning to protect our community.

Course changes for new students