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Topics in PPE - PEP00001C

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  • Department: Philosophy, Politics and Economics
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Dominic Spengler
  • Credit value: 10 credits
  • Credit level: C
  • Academic year of delivery: 2021-22

Module summary

The module gives a well-rounded overview of the theoretical and practical issues of social choice. Each of the three disciplines finds different issues with social decision making, which makes this a very suitable subject for introducing students to interdisciplinary study in PPE.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Summer Term 2021-22

Module aims

The module gives a well-rounded overview of the theoretical and practical issues of social choice. Each of the three disciplines finds different issues with social decision making, which makes this a very suitable subject for introducing students to interdisciplinary study in PPE.

The aims of the module are to introduce students to core concepts in the study of PPE; to provide an appreciation of interdisciplinary study; and to enhance your transferable skills (reading, analysing and thinking through material from a variety of angles).

Module learning outcomes

Subject content

The module helps students to

  •  understand the basics of certain core topics in PPE;
  •  analyse material in a variety of ways related to the three disciplines;
  •  apply and differentiate between the different methods of analysis used by each discipline.

 

Academic and graduate skills

  • Close reading and analysis of problems;
  • An ability concisely to formulate and state thoughts about those problems;
  • An awareness of interdisciplinary studies.

Module content

The module consists of four parts:

  1. Who should vote
  2. Democratic authority
  3. Social choice theory
  4. Choice in practice

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Open Examination (2 day)
Topics in PPE
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

The module is assessed by a 48 hour take-away exam. Students answer any two of four provided questions and submit two 1200 word essays.  The exam paper will be released from and submitted to the PPE submissions VLE site (all further instructions are to be found there).

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Open Examination (2 day)
Topics in PPE
N/A 100

Module feedback

Students will receive written timely feedback on their summative assessment.

They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutors' feedback and guidance hours.

Students have the opportunity to discuss their seminar performance during the module tutors' regular feedback and guidance hours.

Indicative reading

Key reading

Jason Brennan (2011) 'The Right to a Competent Electorate', Philosophical Quarterly 61:245, pp. 700-24.

Sofia Näsström (2011) 'The challenge of the all-affected principle', Political Studies 59:1, pp. 116-134. 

David Estlund 'Introduction: Epistemic Approaches to Democracy'

Lu Hong and Scott E Page 'Groups of diverse problem solvers can outperform groups of high-ability problem solvers'.

Mackie, Gerry (2003) ‘A Long, Dark Shadow over Democratic Politics’ pp. 1–16 in Democracy Defended, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Sen, Amartya (1995) ‘Rationality and Social Choice’ The American Economic Review 85 (1): 1–24.

Bruers, S. (2015), ‘The Core Argument for Veganism’, Philosophia 43(March), 271–290.

URL: https://80000hours.org/2016/11/why-the-hour-you-spend-voting- is-the-most-socially-impactful-of-all/

Wiblin, R. (2017), ‘How much is one vote worth ?’.

 

Complete reading list

https://eu.alma.exlibrisgroup.com/leganto/readinglist/lists/33372596940001381



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.