Effective Pedagogy - MUS00077M

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  • Department: Music
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Liz Haddon
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module summary

This module explores research on effective instrumental and vocal teaching, particularly relating to working with beginner pupils. The module develops study, writing and research skills through consideration and critical appraisal of a range of written material.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20

Module aims

The module will familiarise students with research on effective instrumental and vocal teaching, particularly relating to working with beginner pupils. The module develops understanding of pedagogical theories and concepts and facilitates understanding of contexts for teaching, interpersonal dynamics (the parent-student-teacher relationship), teacher and pupil motivations for involvement in instrumental or vocal lessons, professional concerns and obligations (safeguarding, record-keeping, studio/institutional responsibilities), approaches to learning, teaching for effective learning, and introduction to group teaching with beginner students. The module develops study, writing and research skills through consideration and critical appraisal of a range of written material.

 

Module learning outcomes

Subject content:

On completion of this module students will be able to: 

  • Identify contexts for teaching and understand professional concerns and obligations 

  • Articulate the role of motivation in their own teaching and its function in pupil learning

  • Analyse their own approaches to learning and understand how knowledge of learning styles can inform working with pupils

  • Identify the personal attributes necessary for effective teaching

  • Articulate understanding of the pupil-teacher-parent relationship

  • Identify considerations informing approaches to the first lesson given to a new pupil

  • Understand the different needs of beginner pupils of different ages and in different learning environments

  • Demonstrate critical appraisal skills relating to a pedagogical research article about instrumental/vocal teaching

  • Deploy study and research skills and define and articulate viewpoints in an essay on instrumental/vocal pedagogy

Academic and graduate skills:

  • Show understanding of recent research in the subject and be able to articulate this in written form, demonstrating the ability to critically appraise and convey ideas

Other learning outcomes (if applicable):

  • Develop the quality of academic work, for example, through understanding and applying study skills, referencing, structuring and presenting ideas in written form

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Critical Appraisal
N/A 25
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 75

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Critical Appraisal
N/A 25
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 75

Module feedback

Students will receive feedback on all submitted work within 20 working days of submission. It will be delivered in a written report with additional annotations on a copy of the work.

Indicative reading

Asmus, E.P, & Zdzinski, S. F. (2009). How to read a research article from A to Z. Paper presented at the 28th International Society of Music Education World Conference, Bologna, Italy, August. Retrieved from http://asmus.uga.edu/A2Z/pdf/ThePaperJRME.pdf

Creech, A., & Hallam, S. (2011). Learning a musical instrument: The influence of interpersonal interaction on outcomes for school-aged pupils. Psychology of Music, 39(1), 102-122.

Davidson, J. W., Moore., D. G., Sloboda, J. A., & Howe, M. J. A. (1998). Characteristics of music teachers and the progress of young instrumentalists. Journal of Research in Music Education, 26(1), 141-160.

Fisher, C. (2010). Teaching piano in groups. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Haddon, E. (2009). Instrumental and vocal teaching: How do music students learn to teach? British Journal of Music Education, 26(1), 57-70.

Hallam, S. (1998). Why students learn to play an instrument (Chapter 1). Instrumental teaching: A guide to better teaching and learning (pp.1-20). Oxford: Heinemann Educational Publishers.

Lehmann, A. C., Sloboda, J. A. & Woody, R. H. (2007). The teacher (Chapter 10). Psychology for musicians: Understanding and acquiring the skills (pp. 185-204). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Macmillan, J. (2004). Learning the piano: A study of attitudes towards parental involvement. British Journal of Music Education, 21(3), 295-311.

Mills, J. (2004). Conservatoire students as instrumental teachers. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, no. 161/162, 145-153.

Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 9(3), 105-119.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.