Enhanced Teaching Skills - MUS00072M

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  • Department: Music
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Liz Haddon
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module summary

The module develops understanding of concepts relating to the teaching of advanced learners and for those with special needs. The module develops research skills through further examination of a range of written and online materials.

Related modules

Co-requisite modules

  • None

Prohibited combinations

  • None

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

The module builds on material presented in Terms 1 and 2 and extends knowledge, understanding and research skills. The module develops understanding of concepts relating to the teaching of advanced learners and to working with learners with special needs. Students will also gain understanding of concepts relating to preparing pupils for concerts and performance examinations, memorisation, and understanding the skills required for ensemble teaching. The module develops research skills through further examination of a range of written and online materials.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content:

  • Articulate awareness of different kinds of special needs and appropriate approaches and resources

  • Demonstrate understanding of techniques for memorising music and knowledge of how to facilitate learner memorisation of musical material

  • Articulate understanding of the role of performance in instrumental/vocal learning

  • Detail knowledge of a range of strategies to achieve positive approaches to preparation for and engagement with performance situations including concerts and performance exams

  • Delineate awareness of contextual understanding of the role of group teaching and awareness of appropriate pedagogy for this mode of learning

  • Detail strategies for enhancing advanced technical and expressive learning

  • Understand approaches relating to the teaching and learning of larger-scale musical compositions and technical work

Academic and graduate skills:

  • Demonstrate in-depth understanding of recent research in the subject and be able to articulate this in written form, demonstrating the ability to synthesise, explore, critique and develop ideas in a focused, structured piece of work with a cohesive argument, demonstrating sophisticated presentation, research and bibliographic skills.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 4500 words
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 4500 words
N/A 100

Module feedback

Students will receive feedback on all work submitted within 20 working days of submission. It will be delivered in  a written report.

Indicative reading

Bjøntegaard, B, J. (2015). A combination of one-to-one teaching and small group teaching in higher music education in Norway - a good model for teaching? British Journal of Music Education, 32(1), 23-36.

Burwell, K. (2005). A degree of independence: Teachers’ approaches to instrumental tuition in a university college. British Journal of Music Education, 22(3), 199-215.

Daniel, R. (2004). Innovations in piano teaching: A small-group model for the tertiary level. Music Education Research, 6(1), 23-43.

Davidson, J., & Scutt, S. (1999). Instrumental learning with exams in mind: A case study investigating teacher student and parent interactions before, during and after a music exam. British Journal of Music Education, 16(1), 79-95.

Duke, R. A. & Simmons, A. L. (2006). The nature of expertise: Narrative descriptions of 19 common elements observed in the lessons of three renowned artist-teachers. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, 170, 1-13.

Ginsborg, J. (2004). Strategies for memorising music. In A. Williamon (Ed.), Musical excellence: Strategies and techniques to enhance performance (pp.123-142). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Haddon, E. (2017). Piano performance: Group classes for the lifelong learner. Research Studies in Music Education, 39(1), 57-71.

Hallam, S. (1998a). Individual differences (Chapter 3). In Instrumental teaching: A guide to better teaching and learning (pp. 51-74). Oxford: Heinemann.

Hallam, S. (1998b). Assessment and performance (Chapter 13). In Instrumental teaching: A guide to better teaching and learning (pp. 272-286). Oxford: Heinemann.

Hallam, S. (2001). The development of metacognition in musicians: Implications for education. British Journal of Music Education, 18(1), 27-39.

Henninger, J. C., Flowers, P. J., & Councill, K. H. (2006). Pedagogical techniques and student outcomes in applied instrumental lessons taught by experienced and pre-service American music teachers. International Journal of Music Education, 24(1), 71-84.

Miles, T. R., & Westcombe, J. (Eds.) (2001). Music & dyslexia: Opening new doors. London: Whurr Publishers.

Mills, J. (2003). Musical performance: Crux or curse of music education? Psychology of Music, 31(3), 324-339.

Oglethorpe, S. (2002). Instrumental music for dyslexics: A teaching handbook. London: Whurr Publishers.

Power, A., & McCormack, D. (2012). Piano pedagogy with a student who is blind: An Australian case. International Journal of Music Education, 30(4), 341-353.

Purser, D. (2005). Performers as teachers: Exploring the teaching approaches of instrumental teachers in conservatoires. British Journal of Music Education, 22(3), 287-298.

Thomas, G. (2009). How to do your research project. London: Sage.

Upitis, R., Abrami, P. C., Brook, J., Boese, K., & King, M. (2017). Characteristics of independent music teachers. Music Education Research, 19(2), 169-194.

Ward, V. (2007). Teaching musical awareness: The development and application of a ‘toolkit’ of strategies for instrumental teachers. British Journal of Music Education, 24(1), 21-36.

 

 



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.