International Business Strategy - MAN00018M

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  • Department: The York Management School
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Teresa Da Silva Lopes
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2018-19

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2018-19

Module aims

This module is designed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the major issues and problems associated with the formulation and implementation of international business strategies. This includes the key theories on foreign market entry, business strategy, organisational structure, and issues connected global sourcing. This theoretical understanding will then be illustrated and examined by reference to the way particular firms in contrasting industries have developed and implemented their international strategies. Particular attention will be devoted to understanding and critique of various theories of the multinational enterprise (MNE), evaluating key strategic issues facing the MNEs, and exploring inter-relationship between host government policies and multinational company strategies

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of various theories of MNE;
  • Identify and understand the strategic approaches to international expansion and management;
  • Develop a sound understanding of the constituents of the international business environment and the way these affect strategy and expectations;
  • Evaluate and apply learned concepts and theories.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Coursework
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Coursework
N/A 100

Module feedback

The timescale for the return of feedback will accord with TYMS policy

Indicative reading

Hill, C.W.L. International Business: Competing in the Global Marketplace. McGraw-Hill Irwin



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.