International Business Negotiation - LAW00040M

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  • Department: The York Law School
  • Module co-ordinator: Mrs. Mhairi Morter
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2019-20

Module aims

The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the businesses and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party

Module learning outcomes

  • Understand the business and legal issues and strategies that impact on business negotiations
  • Critically analyse the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions
  • Explain the role of lawyers and law in negotiating international business transactions
  • Be able to draft appropriate communications between parties to an international business transactions

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Departmental - attendance requirement
Attendance
N/A 30
Essay/coursework
Coursework
N/A 70

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Departmental - attendance requirement
Attendance
N/A 30
Essay/coursework
Coursework
N/A 70

Module feedback

Information currently unavailable

Indicative reading

D. Bradlow and J. Finkelstein, Negotiating Business Transactions: An Extended Simulation Course (Wolters Kluwer, Aspen Coursebook Series, 2013).



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.