Education & International Development - EDU00005H

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  • Department: Education
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Eleanor Brown
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module summary

The aim of this module is to understand the role of education in the national development of countries. A further aim is to understand how key theories allow for the analysis of the relationship between education and development.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20

Module aims

The aim of this module is to understand the role of education in the national development of countries. A further aim is to understand how key theories allow for the analysis of the relationship between education and development. The course explores a range of theories and analyses different aspects of education in a variety of contexts. The meaning and nature of development are critically examined and students learn to look at education and development issues through different theoretical lenses. There are opportunities to consider the work of international organisations, including the United Nations, as well as non-governmental organisations, and initiatives such as the Millennium Development Goals and Education for All. The weekly meetings take the form of small, seminar style classes, with lecturer input and participatory activities, encouraging a questioning approach to complex issues with reference to practical case studies and theoretical perspectives.

 

Module learning outcomes

Building on work done in Stage 1 in the Introduction to Contexts of Education, this module asks students to consider how education might contribute to a country?s development and critically analyse what we mean by that. Students will recognise that the patterns of schooling, with which they have been familiar, are culturally situated. The different political, economic and social context of different countries results in different patterns of schooling, and students consider how education both impacts on a country?s development and how levels of development have implications for the way that schooling takes place. Many of the illustrative examples focus on low and middle income countries, where schooling faces a number of different challenges and constraints from those that students may be aware of from a UK perspective.

After completing the module, students will:

  • be familiar with a variety of approaches to development ? such as economics, development studies, postcolonial theory - which have contributed to an analysis of education in developing countries.

  • be able to engage with discussion about what we mean by ?developed? and ?developing? countries and how education might be interpreted differently in different contexts.

  • challenge some of taken-for-granted assumptions about education and development and consider a range of perspectives on how education might contribute to development in the 21st century.

  • understand a range of theories specifically analysing the role of education in ?developing? countries.

Skills

Students will develop their skills of communication, searching for sources, and analysing issues and ideas. Specifically, students will engage in short presentations to the whole group, supplement their assigned readings with ones they have found, and critically examine issues and ideas relating to education and development. Moreover, students will keep a weekly learning journal in which they will develop their critical reflection skills. As an additional skill, students will develop their IT skills by interacting fully with the VLE (Yorkshare).

 

Module content

Class One (week 2) - What is development?

In this lecture we look at the concept of development and different perspectives on how we understand this term and how it relates to education. We discuss some of the historical influences on the development discourse, such as colonialism.

Required Reading:

Unterhalter, Elaine and McCowan, Tristan (eds.) (2015) Education and international development: an introduction. London: Bloomsbury. - Chapter 1 - Education and International Development - A history of the field.

McGrath, Simon, and Gu, Qing (eds.) (2016) Routledge handbook of international education and development. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. - Introduction: International Education and Development

Phillips, David, Schweisfurth, Michele (2006) Comparative and international education: an introduction to theory, method and practice. London: Continuum International Pub. - Chapter 4 - Education and national development: An introduction to key ideas and questions

Optional Readings:

Harber, Clive (2014) Education and international development: theory, practice and issues. Oxford, United Kingdom: Symposium Books. - Education and Development: Introductory Ideas

Phillips, David, Schweisfurth, Michele (2006) Comparative and international education: an introduction to theory, method and practice. London: Continuum International Pub. - Chapter 6 - Researching education and development: Perspectives, practicalities, and ethics

Lam (2008) A Student's Guide to Education Studies ? Chapter 9 - Education in Developing Countries. In Ward (ed.) A Student's Guide to Education Studies. Third Edition. Routledge. pp. 89-97

Video to watch - TED talk

The Danger of a Single Story - Chimamanda Adichie

 

 

Class Two (week 3) - Current Policies in Education and International Development

In this lecture we look some of the current international initiatives including the millennium development goals and sustainable development goals and the education for all policies.

Required Reading

Lewin (1993) Education and development the issues and the evidence - Education Research Paper No. 06. London: DFID - Chapter 1.2 - Policy dialogue and target setting: Do current indicators of Education for All signify progress

McGrath, Simon, and Gu, Qing (eds.) (2016) Routledge handbook of international education and development. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. - Chapter 29 - McGrath (2016) Education and the Post-2015 development agenda

Robertson et al. (2007) Globalisation, Education and Development: Ideas, actors, and Dynamics. London: DFID - Chapter 6 - Poverty, MDGs and Education

Optional Reading

Unterhalter, Elaine and McCowan, Tristan (eds.) (2015) Education and international development: an introduction. London: Bloomsbury. - Chapter 3 - Mundy and Manion (2015) The Education for all initiative: history and prospects post 2015

Deneulin, Séverine with Shahani Lila (eds.) (2009) An Introduction to the Human Development and Capability Approach: Freedom and Agency. London: Earthscan. - Chapter 13 - Deneulin, Séverine and Shahani, Lila (2009) Policy Case Studies

Video Clip to Watch ? TED Talk

Hans Rosling Talk ? The best stats you?ve ever seen.

Class Three (week 4) - Issues in Education and International Development

We look at a range of key issues such as quality in education systems, gender inequality and child labour and you are encouraged to bring issues you identify in your own reading to class for discussion.

Required Reading

Readings of your choice from Compare ? finding issues that interest you.

Harber, Clive (2014) Education and international development: theory, practice and issues. Oxford, United Kingdom: Symposium Books. - Chapter 2: The nature of formal education in developing countries: access, quality, outcomes and inequality. & Chapter 10 Gender, education, development and the role of masculinity.

Skinner, Amy, Baillie Smith, Matt, Brown, Eleanor and Troll, Tobias. (eds.) (2016) Education, learning and the transformation of development. (Rethinking Development). New York and London: Routledge. - Chapter 3 - Shah (2016) Learning, labour and leisure

Optional Reading

McGrath, Simon, and Gu, Qing (eds.) (2016) Routledge handbook of international education and development. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. - Chapter 21 - McCowan and Schendel (2016) The Impact of Higher Education on Development

Allsop, T. and Brock, C. (eds.) Key Issues in Educational Development: Oxford Studies in Comparative Education 3(2) - Chapter 5 - Cammish, N. K. (1993) Sons and Daughters: attitude and issues affecting girls? education in developing countries. Cambridge: Triangle Books

Fennell, S. and Arnot, M. (2008) Gender Education and Equality in a Global Context. London and New York: Routledge. - Chapter 3 - Fennell, S. (2008) Contested Gender Frameworks

Video Clip to Watch ? TED Talk

Micheal Green ? How we can make the world a better place

Class Four (week 5) - Human Capital Theory

We introduce the first of our development theories, Human Capital Theory, and discuss the relationship between investing in education and economic growth, including calculating rates of return.

Required Reading

Lewin (1993) Education and development the issues and the evidence - Education Research Paper No. 06. London: DFID - Chapter 2.1 - Education and economic development

Unterhalter, Elaine and McCowan, Tristan (eds.) (2015) Education and international development: an introduction. London: Bloomsbury. - Chapter 7 - Aslam and Rawal (2015) The Education-Economic growth nexus.

McGrath, Simon, and Gu, Qing (eds.) (2016) Routledge handbook of international education and development. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. - Thomas and Burnett (2016) - Chapter 2 ? Human Capital and Development

Shultz, T. W. (1961) Investment in Human Capital. The American Economic Review, 51(1): 1-17

Optional Reading

Harber, Clive (2014) Education and international development: theory, practice and issues. Oxford, United Kingdom: Symposium Books. - Chapter 3 - Economic development: human capital or dependency and socio-economic reproduction?

Wolf (2001) Does Education Matter? Myths about education and economic growth. London: Penguin Books - Chapter2 - Elixir or snake oil

Psacharopoulos, G. (1981) Returns to education: An Updated International Comparison Comparative Education, 17(3): 321-341

Psacharopoulos, G. and Patrinos, H. A. (2004) Returns to investment in education: a further update. Education Economics. 12:2, 111-134

Video Clip to Watch ? World Economic Forum

Human Capital Report

 

Class Five (week 6) - Group Presentations

In this class you give presentations in small groups on a development issue of your choice in a particular context and you provide feedback on each others? presentationspresenations.

Required Reading

Your own reading in preparation for your presentations. Use the resources on the VLE, search the journals for the issue or country that you are interested in presenting about to identify some interesting information for your presentation.

Optional Reading

These reading may give you some ideas about issues that you could focus on.

Harber, Clive (2014) Education and international development: theory, practice and issues. Oxford, United Kingdom: Symposium Books. - Chapter 8 - Education and green or sustainable development

McGrath, Simon, and Gu, Qing (eds.) (2016) Routledge handbook of international education and development. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. - Chapter 7 - Robinson-Pant, A. (2016) Education and Rural Development: Proposing an alternative paradigm

Skinner, Amy, Baillie Smith, Matt, Brown, Eleanor and Troll, Tobias. (eds.) (2016) Education, learning and the transformation of development. (Rethinking Development). New York and London: Routledge. - Chapter 5 - Ragalsky, P. and Haaland, H. (2016) Ethno-development, education and development

Unterhalter, Elaine and McCowan, Tristan (eds.) (2015) Education and international development: an introduction. London: Bloomsbury. - Chapter 13 - Aikman (2015) Languages and identities

Videos to watch - TED Talks

You are not expected to do a TED talk in the lecture, but these talks give examples of issues affecting specific regions that may be of interest.

Laptops in Colombia

Girls education in AfghanistanAfganistan

Class Six (week 7) - Human Development Theory, Capabilities and Indices

In this lecture we look at the next of our development theories. We discuss Human Development Theory and how this is underpinned by Amartya Sen?s Capability Approach to development as freedom.

Required Reading

Global Monitoring Report (2016) Education for people and planet: Creating sustainable futures for all. Paris: UNESCO - Summary

Walker, Melanie (2005) Amartya Sen?s Capability Approach and Education. Educational Action Research, 13(1) 103-110

Deneulin, Séverine with Shahani, Lila (eds.) (2009) An Introduction to the Human Development and Capability Approach: Freedom and Agency. London: Earthscan. - Chapter 2 - Alkire, Sabina and Deneulin, Séverine (2009) The Human Development and Capability Approach

Optional Reading

Harber, Clive (2014) Education and international development: theory, practice and issues. Oxford, United Kingdom: Symposium Books. - Chapter 6 - Education as harmful to development

Human Capability and Amartya Sen: - special edition (2012) of the Cambridge Journal of Education (volume 42, issue 3) that focuses on Human Capability and the work of Amartya Sen.

  • Capabilities and the global challenges of girls? school enrolment and women?s literacy

  • Inequality, capabilities and poverty in four African countries: girls? voice, schooling, and strategies for institutional change

  • ?Delivering? education; maintaining inequality. The case of children with disabilities in Afghanistan

Videos to watch

Martha Nussbaum ? The Capability Approach

The Human Development Report

 

Class Seven (week 8) - Modernization Theory and its Critiques

In this lecture we introduce two more development theories, the first, Modernisation Theory, is one that influences many of our public perceptions of development. The second, postdevelopment, is a theory that directly challenges these assumptions about development and provides a critique to these discourses.

Required Reading

Harber, Clive (2014) Education and international development: theory, practice and issues. Oxford, United Kingdom: Symposium Books. - Chapter 4 - Modernisation

Skinner, Amy, Baillie Smith, Matt, Brown, Eleanor and Troll, Tobias. (eds.) (2016) Education, learning and the transformation of development. (Rethinking Development). New York and London: Routledge. - Norberg-Hodge, H. (2016) Learning for Life. pp. 50-57

Escobar, A. (1997) The making and unmaking of the world through development. In Rahnema, M. and Bawtree, V (eds.) The Postdevelopment Reader. London: Zed Books

The other way of knowing (Schooling the world website)

Optional Reading

McGinn & Cummings, (1997) Modern Education Reformed - Chapter 1 read pages 24-39

Inkeles, (1975) Becoming Modern: Individual Change in Six Developing Countries Ethos, 3(2), 323-342

Illich, I. (1997) Development as planned poverty. In Rahnema, M. and Bawtree, V (eds.) The Postdevelopment Reader. London: Zed Books

Rapley, J. (2004) Development studies and the post-development critique, Progress in Development Studies. 4(4), 350?354

Video to watch

Schooling the World documentary

Class Eight (week 9) - Postcolonial and Feminist Critiques

In this lecture we look at more critiques to the development discourses and two more theoretical frameworks, postcolonial theory and feminists critiques of development. We also do some work on looking at development issues through different theoretical lenses.

Required Reading

Kothari, U. (2002) Feminist and Postcolonial Challenges to Development. In Kothari, U. and Minogue, M. (eds.) Development theory and practice. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Pp.35-51

McEwan, C. (2009) Postcolonialism and Development, Oxford and New York: Routledge. - Chapter 2 - Postcolonial theory and development

McGrath, Simon, and Gu, Qing (eds.) (2016) Routledge handbook of international education and development. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. - Chapter 6 - Dejaeghere (2016) Reframing gender and education for the post-2015 agenda.

Optional Reading

Omar, S. M. (2012) Rethinking Development from a Postcolonial Perspective, Conflictology, 3(1), 43-49

Escobar, A. (2015) Degrowth, postdevelopment, and transitions: a preliminary conversation. Sustain Sci 10: 451-462.

Andreotti, Vanessa and de Souza, Lynn Mario T. M. (2008) Learning to read the world Through Other Eyes. Derby: Global Education Derby. Retrieved from www.throughothereyes.org.uk

Videos to watch

Schooling the world.org - Buen Vivir

Vanessa Andreotti interview

 

 

Class Nine (week 10) - Assessment preparation and review

We have some discussions about the assessment (ongoing throughout the module) and specific feedback is provided on essay plans. We also review and discuss key ideas and issues raised throughout the course.

Required Reading

McGrath, Simon, and Gu, Qing (eds.) (2016) Routledge handbook of international education and development. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. - Chapter 27 King (2016) History and future of international cooperation in education

McGrath and Gu (2016) Conclusion: Looking beyond 2015 ? the future of international education and development research.

Optional Reading

Read all the optional readings on the theory that you intend to focus on in your assignment.

Use the journals to find more articles on your topic.

Use the international databases and articles in journals to find out more about the country/ies you are going to focus on.

Videos to Watch

Student suggestions from throughout the course of good videos they have found that were interesting/useful.

 

 

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay (5000 words)
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

This module has both formative and summative assessments and students are expected to participate actively throughout the module, both in class discussions and through the blog entries after the weekly class meetings.

Attendance is compulsory for the seminars. In preparation for each seminar, students are expected to have completed the assigned readings and supplemented those readings with others that have been searched for by the student. Students should be fully prepared to discuss the readings at each seminar. Participation in discussion forums on the VLE is also required.

Formative assessment:

  1. Students will contribute to an online discussion forum, reflecting on issues raised throughout the module.

 

  1. There will be opportunities to submit learning blogs for feedback.

 

  1. A group presentation in which students present an aspect of education and an issue relevant to a particular country context, with a focus on a country or countries considered to be ?developing?. Expectations for this short presentation will be given during the first class.

 

  1. A 500 word formative essay to be submitted in week 8 and will be marked and returned in week 9 ? the idea is that this will form an abstract for the summative assignment, allowing students to get some relevant feedback for their final essay.

Summative Assessment

At the start of the module, students will receive a comprehensive overview of the expectations for the final assessment. Activities during each class will help students prepare for the final assessment. Through participation in class, contribution to the online discussion forum, submission of blog entries, group presentations and the 500 word essay student will receive feedback from the lecturer that is directly related to the final assessment. The 5000 word essay is due in week 1 of the Spring term.

A 5,000 word essay is the required submission. Essays should display relevant knowledge of aspects of education in one or more developing countries and also some critical understanding of relevant theoretical perspectives. There should be three key components to the essay. These are (1) a theory by which the issue is analysed (e.g. human capital theory, postcolonial theory etc.) (2) a focus on a country or countries with a demonstration of background knowledge of the context from on line research, and (3) an education related topic (universal primary education, child labour, girls' education etc.). Students negotiate an essay topic that relates to one or more key themes in the module and there is a broad choice and flexibility to allow them to select an issue of interest to them. There will be an opportunity to brainstorm titles for essays as a group.

 

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay (5000 words)
N/A 100

Module feedback

Written feedback on assignment report sheet and face-to- face feedback in supervisions. The feedback is returned to students in line with university policy. Please check the Guide to Assessment, Standards, Marking and Feedback for more information.

Indicative reading

Allsop, T. (1994) Key issues in educational development, Triangle Books

Arnove, R. F.(1999) Comparative education, Rowman & Littlefield

Carnoy, M. (1990) Education and social transition in the Third World, Princeton University Press

Cummings, W. K.(1997) International handbook of education and development, Elsevier Science

Hayden, M. (2007) The Sage handbook of research in international education, SAGE,

Harber, C. (2015) Education and International Development: theory, practice and issues. Symposium books.

McCowen, T. and Unterhalter, E. (2014) Education and International Development: An Introduction. London: Bloomsbury

Plus additional reading relevant to the topic each week.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.