Economic Growth & Development - A Twentieth Century European Perspective - ECO00024I

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  • Department: Economics and Related Studies
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Thilo Huning
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

The module is designed to create the following amongst students:

To appreciate how economic data are collected, what the definitions and hence measures of economic growth are, how reliable the data are and what they actually mean

To bring awareness of the different routes whereby European economies have achieved economic growth and development

To appreciate the relative competitive position of Europe in the global economy

To understand why some European economies are rich and other are poor

To assess the costs and benefits amongst participating economies of European Union.

To appreciate the role of key economic ideas in the formation of economic policy

Module learning outcomes

On completing the module, the student will be able to

Define and measure economic growth and development using a variety of approaches

Analyse the determinants of long-run patterns of economic growth and development: using theory to shed insights and to apply those insights in an empirical manner.

Asssess using a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches the relative position of Europe in the global economy

Apply their insights to explaining the institutional path of development of the European economy.

Evaluate the problems/ dilemmas of economic planning in the 20th century.

Understand and hence place in context the economic, political and social origins of todays European institutions

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Economic Growth & Development – A Twentieth Century European Perspective
2 hours 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Economic Growth & Development – A Twentieth Century European Perspective
2 hours 100

Module feedback

Written feedback will be given on short answer questions submitted by each student prior to each seminar. Strict deadline to be imposed for submission of this work to allow tutor to mark the work.

Students to be encouraged to write one revision essay this work to receive detailed written feedback. Strict deadline to be imposed for submission of this work to allow tutor to mark the work. Suggest that this essay has a deadline for the end of week one in the summer term to fit in with revision and give time for feedback.

Students to be encouraged to discuss their Portfolio work with lecturers and tutors during stated office hours.

Deadlines for the release of marks for the written examination will be in accordance with University Guidelines.

Marks for the written examination will be released anonymously online, and on the Departmental notice boards and website as they become available.

Indicative reading

Stephen Broadberry and Kevin H. O'Rourke, (eds) The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe: Volume 2, 1870 to the Present, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Nicholas Crafts and Gianni Toniolo (eds) Economic Growth in Europe Since 1945, Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Barry Eichengreen, Institutions and economic growth in Europe, Chapter 2 in Nicholas Crafts and Gianni Toniolo (eds) Economic Growth in Europe Since 1945, Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Eichengreen, Barry J. The European Economy since 1945: Coordinated Capitalism and Beyond, Princeton University Press, 2007.

Angus Maddison, The World Economy, A Millennial Perspective, OECD 2006.

Larry Neal and Jeffrey Williamson The Cambridge History of Capitalism Volume 2, Cambridge University Press, 2014

Karl Gunnar Perrson, An Economic History of Europe: Knowledge, Institutions and Growth, 600 to the Present, Cambridge University Press, 2011

Michael Porter The Competitive Advantage of Nations, 1990



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.