Industrial Economics - ECO00008H

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  • Department: Economics and Related Studies
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Bipasa Datta
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Spring Term 2019-20

Module aims

  • To show how microeconomics and game theory can be used to analyse firms' (strategic) behaviour in markets
  • To bridge gaps between theory and real-life examples
  • To raise awareness of industrial and competition policy issues

Module learning outcomes

On completing the module a student will be able to:

  • Define and explain the various concepts used in industrial economics
  • Apply the concepts to understand and explain the structure and behaviour of selected industries
  • Apply theory to real-life examples

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Industrial Economics
3 hours 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Industrial Economics
3 hours 100

Module feedback

Information currently unavailable

Indicative reading

Main textbook:

  • Pepall, Richards, and Norman. Industrial Organization: Contemporary Theory & Empirical Applications. 4th Ed. Blackwell Publishing.

Following books will also be used alongside:

  • Tirole. (1988). The Theory of Industrial Organisation. MIT press.
  • Shy. (1995). Industrial Organization: Theory and Applications. MIT press.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.