Immunology & infection - BIO00050I

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  • Department: Biology
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Allison Green
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module summary

In this module the students will be introduced to the diversity of pathogens that may infect us, and learn the importance of host-pathogen interactions that lead to infection and disease.

Related modules

Pre-requisite modules

Co-requisite modules

  • None

Prohibited combinations

  • None

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

In this module the students will be introduced to the diversity of pathogens that may infect us, and learn the importance of host-pathogen interactions that lead to infection and disease. We will explore the structural features of microbes that aids their virulence, the molecular evasion strategies they employ to prevent eradication and the relationship between our microbiome and infection. As the module progresses, we will explore the immune system; the intrincities of the innate and adaptive systems that collaborate to destroy the microbe prior to wide-spread tissue pathology. The students will learn how defined cells of the two immune systems recognise microbes, the pathways of activation and the weapons the two immune systems use to destroy microbes, exploring how microbes can exploit the tenents of immune cell activation to deride the immune response. Finally, we will discuss how science is capitalising on our knowledge of the microbial and immunological worlds to facilitate vaccine development against the biggest global pathogens.

Module learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this module will have the ability to:

Articulate subject-specific terminology correctly

Identify features that facilitate microbial transmission, infection establishment and evasion of host anti-microbial response

Summarise the cellular and molecular constituents of the innate and adaptive immune systems, and their unique abilities to recognise microbes

Describe the structural and functional attributes of the primary and secondary lymphoid organs essential for an effective anti-microbial response

Illustrate using specific examples how knowledge of complex anti-microbial immune responses promote vaccine development

Employ critical analytical skills to interrogate host-microbial immune responses

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Immunology & Infection
2.5 hours 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Immunology & Infection
2.5 hours 100

Module feedback

Cohort-level feedback will be provided on performance in closed exams and made available via the VLE. Histograms of module marks will be posted on the notice boards outside the Biology Student Services office. Individual marks will be made available to you and your supervisor via e:vision. Exam scripts will be made available at the end of either the Spring or Summer terms. You should take the opportunity to discuss your marks and feedback with your supervisor.

During the teaching of the module you will receive feedback that may be at a whole class or individual level. Forms of feedback may include: model answers and discussion of workshop questions, summaries of performance in practicals, VLE-based quizzes, individual spoken comments during workshops, individual written comments on formative work.  

Indicative reading

These are available through the VLE module site.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.