Pharmacology - BIO00046I

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  • Department: Biology
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Miles Whittington
  • Credit value: 10 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2018-19

Module summary

The subject of Pharmacology focusses on the mechanisms by which chemical entities (drugs, hormones, transmitters, toxins) affect the human body. It is a vital discipline in Biomedical Sciences and of particular relevance to understanding how to treat many pathologies manifest in a patient population. This module will consider the two core components of Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics - how drugs can be administered, their distribution within the body and ultimate metabolism and excretion. Pharmacodynamics - how drugs produce their effects at the level of molecular interactions within certain body systems.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2018-19 to Summer Term 2018-19

Module aims

The subject of Pharmacology focusses on the mechanisms by which chemical entities (drugs, hormones, transmitters, toxins) affect the human body. It is a vital discipline in Biomedical Sciences and of particular relevance to understanding how to treat many pathologies manifest in a patient population. This module will consider the two core components of Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics - how drugs can be administered, their distribution within the body and ultimate metabolism and excretion. Pharmacodynamics - how drugs produce their effects at the level of molecular interactions within certain body systems.

For examples, both theoretical and practical, the module will consider how drugs affect muscles, the control of which is vital for many organismal processes such as movement (skeletal muscle), heart function (cardiac muscle), food absorbtion and control of blood pressure (smooth muscle) in particular, and how drugs affect enzymes, the control of which is vital for all biochemical processes in general . In addition the course will consider genetic aspects of response to drugs, how unwanted toxic effects may occur and how new drugs are discovered and developed before entering the therapeutic arsenal of medical practitioners. The module is primarily lecture and practical-based but with adequate time allocated for private study, and synoptic input for additional learning and revision.

Module learning outcomes

1. Describe the role of pharmacology in the study of disease.

2. Demonstrate an understanding of the action of drugs and factors affecting the interactions of drugs with the human body.

3. Outline the process of drug discovery.

4. Demonstrate an understanding of some experimental approaches in pharmacological science.

5. Describe the contribution that pharmacology makes to other biomedical sciences.

6. Analyse and interpret data from basic pharmacological experiments

Module content

The module will expand upon and bring together aspects of basic neuroscience, cell cycle, intracellular signalling and basic animal biology taught in year 1.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Assessed practical report
N/A 20
University - closed examination
Pharmacology
1.5 hours 80

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

Formative assessment will be provided via VLE based multiple choice questions.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Assessed practical report
N/A 20
University - closed examination
Pharmacology
1.5 hours 80

Module feedback

Feedback on your progress is important to your learning process and we return all first and second year work to you after marking for feedback purposes via Biology Student Services in week 9 or 10 of the spring and summer terms. You will be notified by e-mail when your work is ready for collection.

Module marks are made available to both you and your supervisor via your eVision account as soon as the marks are available, by week 6 of the spring term and week 8 of the summer term. You are expected to discuss your performance and progress with your supervisor in your mid-spring term and end of summer term supervisory meetings.

A histogram of all module marks is produced and posted on the examinations notice board outside Biology Student Services.

Specimen answers are posted on the web: by comparing the specimen answers with your own, you should obtain a clear idea of what was expected of you. For each module the markers will also give general feedback on how well the questions were answered and point out any standard errors that students may have made.

Indicative reading

These are accessible through the VLE module site.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.