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Assessed Seminars: The Modern Landscape - ARC00005H

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  • Department: Archaeology
  • Module co-ordinator: Information currently unavailable
  • Credit value: 40 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2021-22

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2021-22 to Summer Term 2021-22

Module aims

The purpose of the Assessed Seminar is to build upon the seminar skills developed in the 1st and 2nd years and, working together as a group, to allow students to organise and run a seminar on a subject of their own choice, within their seminar option.

The Assessed Seminars aim to develop students understanding of the topic (particularly a critical understanding of the key themes, approaches and opinions), improve their knowledge of the subject area (through reading and preparation for their own seminar, their seminar contributions and involvement in the seminars), and develop their skills in chairing a seminar, presenting material and being involved in discussion (including thinking on their feet about the topic being discussed, how to engage interest in the topic and stimulate debate).

This module aims to explore the changing landscape since the beginning of the eighteenth century. It will look at agricultural improvement, the rise and fall of the landed estate, the impact of industrialisation, empire and war in the nineteenth and twentieth century. It will explore how archaeology and archaeological theory deals with these changes and what it can contribute to our understanding.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate that they are familiar with the literature on aspects of major landscape transformation in the modern age
  • exhibit a firm understanding of the theoretical and methodological issues related to the archaeological study of the modern landscape
  • show familiarity with a range of case studies
  • demonstrate in depth knowledge of a topic of their choosing
  • pick out the key issues in their chosen topic
  • prepare a worksheet which sets out key reading and issues for presentation, debate and discussion, and support the group in the preparation of the seminar
  • chair a seminar, engage interest in the topic, stimulate debate and structure discussion
  • have a critical awareness of the process of collective debate on a specific topic
  • be able to judge the general success of the seminar, and to be able to reflect on this, through a written summary of a seminar
  • present PowerPoint presentations on other subjects within the general theme and contribute informed ideas and information to the other seminars

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Critique
N/A 20
Essay/coursework
Seminar Worksheet
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Chaired Seminar
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 1
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 2
N/A 20

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Critique
N/A 20
Essay/coursework
Seminar Worksheet
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Chaired Seminar
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 1
N/A 20
Oral presentation/seminar/exam
Presentation 2
N/A 20

Module feedback

Students will get oral feedback on the worksheets during their development in weeks 5-10 of the spring term during seminars (or office hours).

Written feedback will be given on their summative work at the end of the summer term.

Indicative reading

  • Driver, F. & Martins, L. (eds) 2005 Tropical Visions in an Age of Empire
  • Finch, J. & Giles, K. (eds) 2007 Estate Landscapes
  • Mingay, G.E. (ed) 1981 The Victorian Countryside 2 vols
  • Rowley, T. 2006 The English Landscape in the Twentieth Century
  • Tarlow, S. 2007 The Archaeology of Improvement in Britain
  • Williamson, T. 1995 Polite Landscapes



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.