In the UK, up to one in four adults and one in ten children will experience a mental health problem each year.

Research across the University of York explores the causes of this growing epidemic and casts new light on the links between mental and physical health. We find ways to prevent problems, and identify, treat and support people with mental ill-health. Working across disciplines and with clinicians and those who live with mental health problems, our research addresses all age groups - from designing more effective interventions in childhood, to identifying and alleviating the causes of depression in older adults and finding ways to build resilience in individuals and communities.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDy04nw1cWQ

Tackling depression in older people

Our researchers conducted the largest UK study into integrated primary care for older people with depression. The CASPER clinical trial showed that a system of collaborative care involving different health professionals reduced the symptoms of depression and was good value for money.

Find out more about the CASPER trial.

Featured researcher
Simon Gilbody

Simon Gilbody

Director of the Mental Health and Addictions Research Group (MHARG)

Professor Gilbody has clinical and research interests in psychosocial, primary care-led interventions for common mental health problems.

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Understanding the links between our physical and mental health

Severe mental illness reduces life expectancy by up to 25 years. There are many reasons for this: type II diabetes is two to three times more prevalent among those with severe mental illness, smoking is more prevalent, and smoking-related diseases more common. Our research includes important work on the links between physical and mental health.
 

Explore the work of the DIAMONDS research project.

Featured researcher
Najma Siddiqi

Najma Siddiqi

Dr Siddiqi’s research interests are physical and mental illness comorbidity, including diabetes in severe mental illness, and delirium in care homes.

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How socio-economic status affects our mental health

One third of the UK’s population will experience a common mental disorder such as anxiety or depression in their lifetime. This is more likely among people who are socio-economically disadvantaged, who are also less likely to have their disorder recognised by the health service and less likely to benefit from treatment. Currently, we know little about how to reduce this mental health inequality. Funded by Wellcome, we are investigating the impact of interventions on mental health inequalities in the UK. 

Find out more about our research programme into the links between mental health and the social determinants of health.

Featured researcher
Stephanie Prady

Stephanie Prady

Dr Prady’s research interests lie in the social determinants of health inequalities, particularly in mental health.

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Working at the frontline of police mental health training

York researchers have developed a specialist training package for North Yorkshire Police to help them deal with incidents involving people with mental health issues. A randomised control trial showed the training improves police knowledge, attitude and confidence in dealing with such incidents.

Explore the work of the Connect project.

Featured researcher
Martin Webber

Martin Webber

Professor Webber’s research interests are in the development and evaluation of social interventions with people with mental health problems.

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Featured researcher
Arabella Scantlebury

Arabella Scantlebury

Dr Scantlebury is a researcher in the York Trials Unit working on projects related to mental health, patient safety and qualitative methods and mixed methods.

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Further information 

For more information about applied mental health research at York, see our brochure: Applied Mental Health Research at York (PDF  , 627kb).