LGBT History Month at the University of York - February 2019

Events at the University of York

Admission is free on the door unless otherwise stated below.

If you have any special access requirements please get in touch with the event contact listed below.

Date

Title

Timing

Venue

Tickets & Enquiries

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Celebrating LGBT History Month

The University of York Library has a large collection of LGBTQ+ related material. Check out our collections webpage and celebrate with us the history, achievements and study of the LGBTQ+ community. Follow our twitter feed for highlights on this year’s theme Peace, Reconciliation and Activism, and the 50th anniversary of Stonewall.

NA

NA

@UoYLibrary

Webpage: www.york.ac.uk/library/collections

04/02/2019

Seditious Gender: Queering Nineteenth Century Female Reformers

Female reformers were active political agents in the Regency reform movement. These inspiring working class women fought for suffrage across Britain. Their story of resisting gendered understandings of femininity and subverting their gender still resonates as powerful activism. My own queer identity impacts my interpretation of the past. I view female reformers in terms of having a seditious gender and female masculinity. What happens when we queer the past history, and archaeology?

18:00-19:30

D/L/116, Derwent L Block, University of York

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

caitlin.kitchener@york.ac.uk yorklgbthistory.org.uk/19/kitchener

18/02/2019

LGBTQ Level 2: Opening Event

LGBTQ Level 2 is our LGBTQ education campaign, which will run for two weeks. The opening event will involve an introduction from the network and an opening speaker.

13:00-15:00

P/L/006, Physics and Electronic Engineering Building, University of York

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Gemma Card 07393 557184 gc986@york.ac.uk

19/02/2019

LGBTQ Level 2: LGBTQ Intersectionality

The second event of LGBTQ Level 2 will focus on intersectionality, in collaboration with the BAME, Working Class and the Women’s Networks. It will involve a mixture of talks, discussions and presentations. A third year history student from York St John University will be giving a presentation on Millicent Price and her diary

14:30-15:30

P/T/006, Physics and Electronic Engineering Building, University of York

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Gemma Card 07393 557184 gc986@york.ac.uk

19/02/2019

Re-writing Connie Converse, Chapter and Verse: Queer Folk, Queer Quietude, and the 1950s Lesbian Bar Scene of Greenwich Village, New York

An exploratory paper recuperating the lost or undiscovered queer folk of songwriter, polymath, and peace academic-activist Connie Converse, who disappeared in her VW camper van in 1974 never to be heard from again. Part queer musicology, part performance, this event will offer a glimpse into Connie Converse’s acoustic music mapped out onto the lesbian bar scene of late 1950s and early 60s Greenwich Village, New York. With acoustic music by Izzy Isgate accompanied by Paul Sparks.

18:00-20:30

Treehouse, Berrick Saul Building, University of York

Tickets:

Free but must register atyorklgbthistory.org.uk/19/connie-converse

Enquiries:

Boriana Alexandrova boriana.alexandrova@york.ac.uk

20/02/2019

Ten Reasons to Read Radclyffe Hall – a talk by Dr Hannah Roche

While some might disagree with her claim that Radclyffe Hall’s The Well of Loneliness (1928) is “quite possibly the worst novel ever written,” Terry Castle is right that legions of lesbian readers have felt ashamed and frustrated by The Well’s bleak outlook and apparently even bleaker author. Over 90 years since The Well was banned for obscenity, Dr Hannah Roche tells us why Hall was a wonderful writer, a progressive queer thinker, and a whole lot more besides.

17:15-18:45

Treehouse, Berrick Saul Building, University of York

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Deborah Russell deborah.russell@york.ac.uk

20/02/2019

Jewish/Queer Intersections: What Happens After Equality?

Discrimination against LGBT+ people in the UK has declined and we have received some equal rights over the last decade. Should we fully embrace our newfound rights/privileges? Is there a way for us to hold on to some of the lessons of discrimination? The Jewish community, who received equal rights in this country in the nineteenth century and have intermittently faced antisemitism ever since, have much experience with this question. Come hear a queer rabbi reflect on this question.

 

18:30-19:30

D/L/116, Derwent L Block, University of York


Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Emmett Stone

jewish@yusu.org

yorklgbthistory.org.uk/19/jewish-queer-intersections

21/02/2019

LGBTQ Level 2: Bisexuality Q&A

A discussion about bisexuality, which will be open to questions. Topics will include history, misconceptions and bisexuality as an individual identity.

17:00-19:00

P/L/005 Physics and Electronic Engineering Building, University of York

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Gemma Card 07393 557184 gc986@york.ac.uk

25/02/2019

Normativity and the Discourse of ‘Normal’ in an LGBT Youth Group

In this talk, Lucy Jones will present data emerging from research carried out with an LGBT youth group in the north of England. She will use discourse analysis to show how this group of young people construct and make use of the notion of ‘being normal’ in their identity work. She will show that they draw on homonormative ideologies in their identity construction, but also that this happens in response to the homophobia and ‘othering’ they have experienced from those in their local community. She will also argue that their discourse must be understood via an intersectional framework; the ways that the young people talk about being LGBT reveal the relevance of their socioeconomic class, and they also draw on racist ideologies in their identity construction as LGBT people.

16:00-17:30

C/B/101, Chemistry Buildings, University of York

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Eva Zehentner

eva.zehentner@york.ac.uk 01904 322661

26/02/2019

IGDC Research Seminar - Navigating Risks in LGBTIQ* Activism

LGBT History Month research seminar with talks from Dr Alan Msosa (IGDC) on 'The situation of homophobia in Africa' and Dr Alice Nah (Centre for Applied Human Rights) on 'Navigating risks of LGBTQI Activism'. 

15:00-16:30

D/N/056 - Politics Meeting Room, Derwent College

 

Tickets:

*UoY staff and students only*

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

maria-eugenia.giraudo@york.ac.uk nicole.beardsworth@york.ac.uk

26/02/2019

LGBTQ Level 2: Transgender Talk

A talk on the history of transgender and non-binary people, misconceptions, medical transition and being respectful.

15:30-17:30 D/L/002, Derwent L Block, University of York

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Gemma Card 07393 557184 gc986@york.ac.uk

28/02/2019

LGBTQ Level 2: Culture and Religion Panel Discussion

An open discussion about the experiences and difficulties of being LGBTQ in various cultural and religious backgrounds, past and present.

15:30-16:30 LMB/044, Law and Management Building, University of York, Heslington East, Freboys Lane

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Gemma Card 07393 557184 gc986@york.ac.uk

01/03/2019

LGBTQ Level 2: Closing Event

The LGBTQ Level 2 closing event will consist of a round up of the event series and hopefully a speaker from the university.

17:00-19:00 D/L/036, Derwent L Block, University of York,

Tickets:

Free, no need to book

Enquiries:

Gemma Card 07393 557184 gc986@york.ac.uk

01/03/2019

LGBTQ Level 2: Queer Cabaret After Party

A queer themed open mic night with music until late to celebrate the end of the LGBTQ Level 2 campaign

20:00- late The Lounge, James College, University of York

Tickets:

Small donation on the door

Enquiries:

Gemma Card 07393 557184 gc986@york.ac.uk

See information about visiting the University of York campus and facilities on campus.

**Please note that the event on 13 February entitled Hidden Stories of LGBT+ Scientists and the Gen Silent film screening on 23 February have been cancelled, our apologies for any inconvenience this may cause.

 

 

Created by the Equality and Diversity Office

February 2019

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