Breaking up Communities: The social impact of housing demolition in the late twentieth century. Study and information sharing day

Friday 2 November 2012, 10.00AM to 16:00

Speaker(s): Becky Tunstall and Stuart Lowe

The issue: One in seven of all homes in big cities in England and Wales in 1955 had been demolished by 1985. Slum clearance has been part of the history of a substantial minority of families, neighbourhoods and communities across the UK. Until the mid 1960s, clearance was generally seen as costly but essential and worthwhile. Then opinions began to change: demolition began to be seen as ineffective, expensive, and socially costly, because it 'broke up communities'.

What can we learn looking back? How strong was the evidence for the idea that clearance broke up strong communities against the will of residents? Did things vary from place to place? And are there any similarities with more recent housing demolition?

The event: The study and information sharing day is hosted by the Centre for Housing Policy at the University of York. It will present the results of a new review of literature on slum clearance in England 1945-75, exploring the extent to which it ‘broke up communities’, carried out by Prof. Becky Tunstall and Dr. Stuart Lowe (supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council as part of its Connected Communities programme).

There will be a small number of other speakers, from academic and varied backgrounds, sharing their information on demolition 1945-75 and more recent programmes, and opportunity for discussion.

Venue: The event will be held at Grays Court, an historic building next to York Minister, about 15mins walk from the train station.

THIS EVENT IS FULLY BOOKED.  FOR NEWS OF THE PROCEEDINGS, CHECK OUR NEWS PAGES IN COMING WEEKS.

Location: Grays Court, York

Admission: Event fully booked