'Dead Standing Things ': New display at Tate Britain

Posted on 19 June 2012

'Dead Standing Things: Still Life in Britain, 1660-1740' is a new display at Tate Britain. It is an outcome of the AHRC-funded 'Court, Country, City: British Art 1660-1735' research project.

A familiar genre today, still life painting became established in Britain in the late seventeenth century. Writing in the 1650s, the author William Sanderson referred to such paintings as ‘dead-standing-things’, the term ‘still life’ (from the Dutch ‘stilleven’) only appearing in the following decades. The Dead Standing Things: still life 1660-1740  display has been been devised by Tate Britain curator Tim Batchelor and runs until 16 September 2012. It is an outcome of the AHRC-funded  Court, Country, City: British Art 1660-1735  research project, launched in October 2009. Professor Mark Hallett is co-Principle Investigator of the project. Two University of York/Tate Britain PhD students, Caroline Good and Peter Moore, who are members of the project team, have also contributed essays which are available online on Dead Standing Things: still life 1660-1740 web page.

Read a review of the display from the Time Literary Supplement TLS Review (PDF , 1,386kb) .