Scientists develop new antibiotic for gonorrhoea

Posted on 4 January 2017

Chemists and biologists at the University of York have harnessed the therapeutic effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules to develop a new antibiotic which could be used to treat the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea.

The infection is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Scientists at the University of York have harnessed the therapeutic effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules to develop a new antibiotic which could be used to treat the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea.

The infection, which is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae, has developed a highly drug-resistant strain in recent years with new cases reported in the north of England and Japan.

There are concerns that gonorrhoea, which is the second most common sexually transmitted infection in England, is becoming untreatable.

Almost 35,000 cases were reported in England during 2014, with most cases affecting young men and women under the age of 25.

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