Accessing Archaeology - Scarborough Castle

Queen's Anniversary Prize winner in recognition of teaching and research excellence

Examining fishbone samples in teaching laboratory

A top 10 University for archaeology

Main Page Banner - Image 3 / Dav Smith

Consistently number 1 for student satisfaction in the National Student Survey

Located in York, England's archaeological capital

Located in York, the UK's archaeological capital

Vibrant, friendly community with focus on small teaching groups

Vibrant, friendly community with focus on small teaching groups

The Department of Archaeology at York is internationally recognised as both a vibrant research community and a centre of excellent teaching. We offer a diverse range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses, and pride ourselves on providing a supportive, enthusiastic, and challenging academic atmosphere which enables our students to achieve their full potential.

Information on change of course, clearing and adjustment in Archaeology at York

Welcome to York

Welcome to the Department of Archaeology at the University of York where we are proud to be at the forefront of archaeological ‌research and teaching.

Our range of interests and expertise covers human history from prehistory to present. Studying archaeology helps us to understand the past, ourselves and our future.

York is the UK's archaeological capital and is the ideal place to study archaeology. With us you will develop a range of skills that will enhance your employment prospects both inside and outside the sector.

Dr John Schofield 
Head of Department

Our courses

Research and teaching excellence

 Queens Anniversary Prize 2011

We were awarded the Queen’s Anniversary Prize in 2011 in recognition of research and teaching excellence.

York 800

In 2012, York celebrated 800 years of being a self-governing city. Watch the video to see how York has developed into a vibrant, exciting place to live, work and study. 

News

Embalming study ‘rewrites’ key chapter in Egyptian history

Posted on Wednesday 13 August 2014

Researchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.


Election to British Academy

Posted on Wednesday 23 July 2014

Matthew Collins elected Fellow of the British Academy


Events