Context

Loss of one sensory modality leads to an increased reliance on the remaining senses, and as a result, the unaffected senses often become relatively enhanced. For example, deaf individuals are better at detecting peripheral visual stimuli, suggesting that their visual system has adapted to differences in visual experience.

The research

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroimaging techniques, we measure the anatomical and physiological changes in the eyes and brain associated with increased peripheral visual sensitivity in deaf adults.

Featured publications

Contact us

York Neuroimaging Centre
reception@ynic.york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 435346
+44 (0)1904 435356
York Neuroimaging Centre, The Biocentre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5NY
@UOY_YNiC

Featured researcher
Heidi Baseler

Heidi Baseler

Dr Baseler's research focuses on understanding the neural mechanisms specialised for processing central and peripheral vision, and how these mechanisms respond to sensory loss (visual or auditory).

View profile

Featured researcher
André Gouws

André Gouws

Dr Gouws' research interests include neurochemistry, face processing, illusory stimuli and cortical reorganisation.

View profile

Featured researcher
Alex Wade

Alex Wade

Professor Wade's research interests include visual attention, the representation of colour and contrast in the human brain and the way in which these processes are affected by neurological diseases.

View profile

Featured researcher
Tony Morland

Tony Morland

Professor Morland is interested in how the brain organises visual information in the light of visual deficits that arise as a result of disease or damage to the visual system and the effects of visual diseases and disorders on visual function.

View profile

Contact us

York Neuroimaging Centre
reception@ynic.york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 435346
+44 (0)1904 435356
York Neuroimaging Centre, The Biocentre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5NY
@UOY_YNiC