Context

Our visual brain is able to tell us when something is moving towards us. Some of the cues to this motion are obvious (for example, things get larger as they approach), some are more subtle. In this Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) funded project, we examined how the brain sees 3D motion by comparing signals from the left and right eyes. 

The research

We found that two distinct visual pathways provide different types of information to the brain and allow us to see both fast and slow motion in depth. Using state-of-the-art display and neuroimaging systems, we were able to visualise the locations of these two pathways using functional brain imaging and we used Electroencephalography (EEG) to find out when signals in these two pathways were available for decision making.

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York Neuroimaging Centre
reception@ynic.york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 435346
+44 (0)1904 435356
York Neuroimaging Centre, The Biocentre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5NY
@UOY_YNiC

Featured researcher
Alex Wade

Alex Wade

Professor Wade's research interests include visual attention, the representation of colour and contrast in the human brain and the way in which these processes are affected by neurological diseases.

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Contact us

York Neuroimaging Centre
reception@ynic.york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 435346
+44 (0)1904 435356
York Neuroimaging Centre, The Biocentre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5NY
@UOY_YNiC