#1 Mathematics department in the Russell Group (National Student Survey 2017)

World-class research in Mathematics

Emphasis on small group teaching: comprehensive tutorial and seminar system to support students

Enthusiastic staff with broad, interdisciplinary research interests

Department of Mathematics

Welcome 

Welcome to the Department of Mathematics at the University of York.

We are a community of mathematicians from all over the world, engaged in world-class research and committed to excellence in teaching with a special emphasis on small groups and a friendly atmosphere. If you would like to find out more about our activities, take a look around our website or get in touch via maths-enquiries@york.ac.uk.

Professor Niall MacKay
Head of Department

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phila4. Credit: fdecomite / flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Research

Our values

We support the principles laid out in the London Mathematical Society Good Practice Scheme, and aim to create an inclusive, mutually supportive community which enables everyone to do their best possible work and where everyone is treated with dignity and respect regardless of individual characteristics such as age, gender, disability, religion or ethnicity. 

We hold the Bronze Award of the Athena SWAN programme for women in science. Eight of our academic staff are women, along with about 40% of our students. 

Undergraduate study

Postgraduate study

Vacancies

News

York mathematician appointed as LMS Holgate Session Leader

Posted on Friday 18 August 2017

Dr Stephen Connor has been selected to be a London Mathematical Society Holgate Session Leader.


Outstanding 2017 NSS Result

Posted on Thursday 10 August 2017

With an overall satisfaction rate of 95% for our Mathematics Department, York is confirmed as one of the best places to study Maths in the UK.


New breakthrough discovery: Every quantum particle travels backwards

Posted on Monday 17 July 2017

Mathematicians at the Universities of York, Munich and Cardiff have identified a unique property of quantum mechanical particles – they can move in the opposite way to the direction in which they are being pushed.


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Events

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