Context

Our visual perception of the continuous electromagnetic spectrum consists of combinations of only three discrete signals. Nonetheless, we are able to perceive a large number of distinct colours, and are able to maintain the perception of the colour of objects despite relatively large changes in the electromagnetic spectra of light reflected from those objects our eyes in differing lighting conditions.

The research

The magnetoencephalography (MEG) at the York Neuroimaging Centre allows us to record the magnetic fields associated with electric signals in the brain as quickly as 15,000 times a second, providing direct and time-resolved measurements of neural activity. For this reason, we are undertaking MEG experiments to investigate how, when, and where, colour signals are combined in the visual pathway.

Featured publications

Contact us

York Neuroimaging Centre
reception@ynic.york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 435346
+44 (0)1904 435356
York Neuroimaging Centre, The Biocentre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5NY
@UOY_YNiC

Featured researcher
André Gouws

André Gouws

Dr Gouws' research interests include neurochemistry, face processing, illusory stimuli and cortical reorganisation.

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Featured researcher
Tony Morland

Tony Morland

Professor Morland is interested in how the brain organises visual information in the light of visual deficits that arise as a result of disease or damage to the visual system and the effects of visual diseases and disorders on visual function.

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Contact us

York Neuroimaging Centre
reception@ynic.york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 435346
+44 (0)1904 435356
York Neuroimaging Centre, The Biocentre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5NY
@UOY_YNiC