Accessibility statement

Department of Archaeology

The global pandemic is certainly posing challenges for everyone but here in Archaeology we are committed to ensuring an excellent teaching experience for all our students. How we deliver our modules depends on government guidance and we've worked hard to ensure our usual high standard of teaching is delivered in inclusive and accessible ways. We are committed to teaching in person at King's Manor or on the main University Campus West wherever possible, while also providing alternative teaching to those students who might not be able to get to York.

We've created an engaging experience that's carefully designed to develop important skills as you explore the world of Archaeology with us. We'll continue to be a friendly community for students whether in person or online - our students always come first.

We're updating our Coronavirus webpages regularly with the latest information for staff and current students.

Professor Nicky Milner, Head of Department

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Journals

King's Manor is home to four journals:

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Research

News

York academics lead partnership to revitalise famous York Street

Friday 12 November 2021

A project to breathe new life into one of York’s historic streets has been given the go-ahead after receiving funding of almost half a million pounds from the Government’s Community Renewal Fund.


Vacancy in Digital Archaeology

Wednesday 20 October 2021

We have a new vacancy for an Associate Lecturer in Digital Archaeology to start in the new year


Drawing helps archaeologists understand the past

Wednesday 20 October 2021

New interdisciplinary project reveals knowledge production in archaeology


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Researcher in focus

 

Akinbowale Akintayo

 

Akinbowale is a landscape archaeologist who is passionate about applying GIS methodologies for spatial and temporal analyses of landscapes. In the last 15 years, he has been involved in GIS analyses and training of undergraduate and graduate students on the applications of GIS and remote sensing methodologies in environmental sciences. His work experience has enabled him to use GIS tools to solve various kinds of environmental and archaeological problems and  with time, he has discovered new areas where he may further apply these skills (particularly in mapping of historic and heritage sites). Aside from this, he has been involved in several GIS projects involving data collection, spatial analyses, and land use change in different parts of Nigeria and Spain.

In his role with the MAEASaM project, Akinbowale is applying GIS and remote sensing techniques to identify past, present, and potential future threats to the integrity of heritage sites and monuments in Tanzania and Zanzibar.