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York student awarded placement in Washington DC

Posted on 14 October 2015

A University of York doctoral student has been awarded a placement at the Library of Congress in Washington DC through the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) International Placement Scheme.

Louisa LeeLouisa Lee

Louisa Lee, a first year PhD student in History of Art, is one of 27 UK early career academics to be offered the opportunity to enhance their research with a US fellowship at either the Library of Congress or the Smithsonian Institution.

Ms Lee’s research explores the history of Conceptual art in Britain from 1964 to 1979. Supervised by Dr Jo Applin, Senior Lecturer in York’s Department of History of Art, and Dr Andrew Wilson, Curator in Modern and Contemporary British Art and Archives at the Tate, her findings will contribute towards Tate’s research into their collection, culminating in an exhibition in 2016.

The Library of Congress is the USA's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections.

Louisa Lee said: “I am thrilled to be awarded this placement at the Library of Congress. As well as having access to an unparalleled collection of books and resources at the Library, this five-month long fellowship will enable me to meet other early-career academics and to establish connections for possible future collaborations.

“Despite international interest, there has been little research carried out into the specific history and conditions of Conceptual art in Britain. I will explore the historical focus and social contexts in which it was produced and received, and also the unresolved area of absent women artists in major exhibitions and publications from the period. This is a fantastic opportunity and I’m very much looking forward to my time in Washington DC.”

Danielle Moore-Chick, Communications Manager at the AHRC, said: “In an increasingly globalised world there is a need for researchers to build strong international connections and experiences.  This scheme facilitates such experiences by providing funded fellowships at some of the world’s leading research institutions, offering dedicated access to their globally renowned collections, resources and expertise.”

Further information:

  • The AHRC’s International Placement Scheme (IPS) aims to provide early career researchers, doctoral-level research assistants and AHRC/ESRC-funded doctoral students with dedicated access to the internationally renowned research collections/ programmes/ expertise held at the host IPS institutions. Through the access provided by the scheme, academics have the opportunity to enhance the depth, range and quality of research activities and network with other international scholars. For more information, visit: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/documents/projects-programmes-and-initiatives/international-placement-scheme/
  • The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funds world-class, independent researchers in a wide range of subjects: ancient history, modern dance, archaeology, digital content, philosophy, English literature, design, the creative and performing arts, and much more. This financial year the AHRC will spend approximately £98m to fund research and postgraduate training in collaboration with a number of partners. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK. For further information, visit: www.ahrc.ac.uk
  • For more information about the University of York’s Department of History of Art, visit: https://www.york.ac.uk/history-of-art/

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