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Open Lectures at the University of York

A lecture audience (c) John Houlihan

Every term, the University organises free open lectures on a wide variety of topics and aimed at a general audience.  Some require tickets (available on individual event pages) but most do not. Where tickets are needed, this is also indicated in the publicity.

We distribute information on upcoming lectures to interested members of the public at the start of each academic term (October, January and April). If you would like to receive a free copy of this leaflet either by email or by post, please join our mailing list.  Updated lecture details are also available here on our web pages. As they are updated frequently, they may publicise lectures which we were unable to include in the leaflet.

If you have an accessibility need, please contact us at open-lectures@york.ac.uk or 01904 324466, and we will make every effort to accommodate you.

The majority of lectures are held on the University campus. There is a regular bus service and the campus is easily accessible by bicycle. Car parking is available in the Pay & Display car parks, which are free after 6pm. More information on reaching the University together with maps and additional parking information can be found on our Information for Visitors webpages.

Download our Summer term 2018 open lectures leaflet (PDF  , 970kb)

See all of our current and previous lectures this term

Have a question about open lectures? See our FAQs, or email us. 

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Subscribe to our mailing list to receive up-to-date information on upcoming open lectures and events.

 

 

Upcoming events

Tue
29
May

Archbishop Wulfstan and the Peace of God

This lecture takes a new look at the preaching of Archbishop Wulfstan of York and sets it in the context of the contemporary continental movement, the Peace of God

Tue
29
May

Caliphs, Popes and Gold: Money and long-distance connections in the Early Middle Ages

This talk looks at how money created a series of cultural interconnections which bound Anglo-Saxon England to the rest of mainland Europe and, ultimately, to the Muslim world

Wed
30
May

Advanced neuroimaging of pain, analgesia and anaesthesia induced altered states of consciousness

A stimulating and enlightening lecture on how the human brain responds to pain, pain relief and anaesthesia

Tue
5
Jun

Addressing the commercial determinants of health: David versus Goliath?

The rise in childhood and adult obesity is inequitable and avoidable; it urgently needs to be arrested and then reversed...

Wed
6
Jun

Public faith and the everyday ethics of urban life

This lecture explores conservative evangelicals’ everyday efforts to ‘go public’ with their faith – including their countercultural teachings on gender, sexuality, and other religions – and how their efforts are shaped by their sense of themselves as a persecuted minority in a secular city

Thu
7
Jun

Education and social justice: Investigating gender-based violence and social mobility

Professor Paul Wakeling and Professor Vanita Sundaram talk about social mobility and sexual harassment in education

Thu
7
Jun

Liminal landscapes: People and place in the work of Winifred Holtby and Philip Larkin

This lecture will explore some of the ways in which Winifred Holtby and Philip Larkin drew upon the landscape of Holderness to explore themes of identity in terms of the relationship between people and place.

Tue
12
Jun

‘My Dearest Tussy’: Coping with separation during the Napoleonic Wars

Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies present a talk on separation during the Napoleonic Wars

Wed
20
Jun

Getting romantic at the movies: An old look at a new art

Romanticism and the movies make unlikely bedfellows: the former is outmoded and focused on the individuality of the artist; the latter are both recent and completely collaborative. In this lecture, Rafe shows why the unlikely couple might nonetheless be a match made in heaven

Mon
25
Jun

Just Genomes?

Does the study of human genetic variation reignite scientific racism?

Fri
20
Jul

Playhouses in Shakespeare’s time: why ‘play’? why ‘house’?

As York celebrates the coming of the Rose playhouse to the city, this free pre-show talk asks what ‘playhouse’ really means and how this affects our understanding of Shakespeare