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Open Lectures at the University of York

A lecture audience (c) John Houlihan

Every term, the University organises free open lectures on a wide variety of topics and aimed at a general audience.  Some require tickets (available on individual event pages) but most do not. Where tickets are needed, this is also indicated in the publicity.

We distribute information on upcoming lectures to interested members of the public at the start of each academic term (October, January and April). If you would like to receive a free copy of this leaflet either by email or by post, please join our mailing list.  Updated lecture details are also available here on our web pages. As they are updated frequently, they may publicise lectures which we were unable to include in the leaflet.

If you have an accessibility need, please contact us at open-lectures@york.ac.uk or 01904 324466, and we will make every effort to accommodate you.

The majority of lectures are held on the University campus. There is a regular bus service and the campus is easily accessible by bicycle. Car parking is available in the Pay & Display car parks, which are free after 6pm. More information on reaching the University together with maps and additional parking information can be found on our Information for Visitors webpages.

Download our Summer term 2018 open lectures leaflet (PDF  , 970kb)

See all of our current and previous lectures this term

Have a question about open lectures? See our FAQs, or email us. 

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Upcoming events

Wed
25
Apr

Negotiating digital rights: Public attitudes on online privacy and targeting, at home and at work

Understanding, negotiating and maintaining digital rights to privacy is an issue of concern for both social justice, and individual, civil rights.

Tue
1
May

RESCHEDULED - Who let the dogs out? Reporting guns, knives, race and crime

The manner in which growing political and economic inequalities are not only replicated in journalism but increasingly being amplified by it, is clearly illustrated in the reporting race and crime...

Wed
2
May

Winnicott's Magic: 'Playing and Reality' and reality

The Summer term lecture from writer and psychoanalyst Adam Phillips

Thu
3
May

Madness: Ideas about insanity

This talk will examine the question ‘what is madness?’. Ideas from psychiatry and the social sciences will be applied to the autobiographical stories of those considered mad in the past and in the present

Wed
9
May

Light, darkness and belonging in a modernist housing scheme

Can light or dark add to our understanding of belonging?

Wed
9
May

Magical realism: The making of a global literature and international anthology

What exactly makes a work of fiction magical realist? What does the term mean? And why do writers of magical realism frequently have a political message for authoritarian or repressive regimes?

Tue
15
May

Speaking truth to power: There can be no safety for patients when there is none for doctors and nurses

Dr Iona Heath discusses what needs to be done to protect both patients and health professionals in the modern age

Tue
15
May

The microscopic world in 3D

Dr Laurence Wilson and Dr Pegine Walrad discuss the future of 3D microscopy

Thu
17
May

What the sugar coating on your cells is trying to tell you

In this Equality and Diversity Beacon Seminar, Professor Carolyn Bertozzi will talk about her prize winning work on the Chemistry of Living Systems

Tue
22
May

Sexual selection and queer beauty

This lecture deals with the tension between an orthodox theory of the sexual selection of ornament, the "sense of beauty," and the "art-sense" in the struggle for successful mating within the (human) species, on the one hand, and, on the other, the role of non-procreatively oriented sexualities in the generation of attractions and forms of beauty

Thu
24
May

Shakespeare's Bibles

Professor Shuger is the author of many important books including The Renaissance Bible (1994), and is a former colleague of CA Patrides.

Thu
24
May

Healthy eating as the new religion

From the ancient Pythagoreans to the Transcendentalist movement in nineteenth century America, what we ingest has long been imbued with spiritual significance

Thu
24
May

RESCHEDULED - A book a day keeps the doctor away

Are books good for you? Can they change the world?

Wed
6
Jun

Public faith and the everyday ethics of urban life

This lecture explores conservative evangelicals’ everyday efforts to ‘go public’ with their faith – including their countercultural teachings on gender, sexuality, and other religions – and how their efforts are shaped by their sense of themselves as a persecuted minority in a secular city

Thu
7
Jun

Education and social justice: Investigating gender-based violence and social mobility

Professor Paul Wakeling and Professor Vanita Sundaram talk about social mobility and sexual harassment in education

Thu
7
Jun

Liminal landscapes: People and place in the work of Winifred Holtby and Philip Larkin

This lecture will explore some of the ways in which Winifred Holtby and Philip Larkin drew upon the landscape of Holderness to explore themes of identity in terms of the relationship between people and place.

Tue
12
Jun

‘My Dearest Tussy’: Coping with separation during the Napoleonic Wars

Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies present a talk on separation during the Napoleonic Wars

Wed
20
Jun

Getting romantic at the movies: An old look at a new art

Romanticism and the movies make unlikely bedfellows: the former is outmoded and focused on the individuality of the artist; the latter are both recent and completely collaborative. In this lecture, Rafe shows why the unlikely couple might nonetheless be a match made in heaven