Efficient catalytic materials that facilitate chemical transformation are central to a diverse range of applications in chemical industries and integral to clean energy generation technologies.

The growth in hydrogen or alcohol powered fuel cells to support the development of exhaust-free vehicles, for instance, and the development of ultra-clean electricity generation plants, depends critically on innovative, high-performing catalytic materials.

CEEM’s researchers are taking the centuries old process of catalysis and making it fit for purpose in the 21st century, by combining fundamental research and experimental science using advanced microscopy with first principles modelling techniques.

They have a global reputation for their advances in:

  • Developing novel nanocatalysts for fuel cells
  • Design of nanoscale materials for the production of biofuels
  • Creation of new materials for carbon capture and utilisation
  • Atomic engineering for next generation semiconductors.

This reputation is built on a distinctive approach to research and partnership:

  • Process friendly, collaborative culture
  • First principles modelling to test, design and refine new energy efficient materials
  • High powered electron microscopy – bespoke to CEEM – to inform atomic engineering.

Contact us

Centre for Energy Efficient Materials
ceem@york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 322251
Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD

Highlight research

Catalyst for change

CEEM’s researchers’ work in developing of state-of-the-art atomic resolution microscopes is helping to transform the UK specialty chemicals industry – especially in the field of catalysis, where the ability to arrange, control and anchor materials on a nanometer scale is critical to success.

Carbon dioxide - a clean energy source

CEEM researchers have not only developed and patented a cheap and environmentally friendly way of capturing carbon dioxide emissions from coal and gas-fired power stations, but have also perfected a catalytic process that will convert this stored carbon into a chemical that is essential for providing clean energy for battery operated cars.

Contact us

Centre for Energy Efficient Materials
ceem@york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 322251
Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD