Context

Photosynthesis harnesses energy from sunlight to drive the fixation of CO2 into the organic carbon building blocks of life. Eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria play fundamental roles in global biogeochemical cycles, yet there are still substantial gaps in our knowledge of how they acquire their CO2.

The research

The Mackinder Lab research focuses on how photosynthetic microbes efficiently transport CO2 from their surrounding environment and concentrate it in the proximity of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) - the principle carbon fixing enzyme. We use high-throughput, systems biology approaches to rapidly identify key components of this CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM). These data are used to guide the engineering of a CCM in higher plants to improve photosynthetic performance.

A protein spatial interaction map of the model alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CO2 concentrating mechanism. Many of the identified components are being engineered into plants to improve CO2 fixation. Mackinder et al. 2017 Cell 171:133-147.

Contact us

Centre for Novel Agricultural Products

cnap@york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 328776
Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York YO10 5DD

Related links

Mackinder Lab

Featured researcher
Luke Mackinder

Luke Mackinder

Professor Mackinder's research focuses on understanding the molecular basis of carbon fixation in algae and cyanobacteria. 

View profile

Contact us

Centre for Novel Agricultural Products

cnap@york.ac.uk
+44 (0)1904 328776
Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York YO10 5DD

Related links

Mackinder Lab