Skip to content

York academic leads international meeting on swarm robotics

Posted on 11 March 2013

A University of York professor will play a key role at the prestigious Royal Society Frontiers of Science meeting in Russia this week.

Professor Jon Timmis, from York’s Departments of Computer Science and Electronics, will lead a joint session exploring the scientific and engineering challenges of creating robotic systems that can operate for extended periods of time without human intervention.

Frontiers of Science is a series of international meetings for outstanding early career scientists organised by the Royal Society in partnership with national academies and scientific organisations around the world.

Participants are encouraged to present and discuss the most pressing or stimulating research questions at the frontiers of their field, and to identify new and emerging scientific challenges on the horizon of current knowledge.

I am very honoured to be leading this Royal Society session, which aligns well with my own research and the challenges we are facing at York

Professor Jon Timmis

The Royal Society Frontiers of Science 2013 meeting, in partnership with the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tartarstan, will take place in Kazan, Republic of Tartarstan, Russia from 12 to 14 March.

Professor Timmis, a Senior Research Fellow of the Royal Society, will lead the Information Technology session “Long term autonomous systems: from individuals to swarms” with Dr Airat Khasianov from Kazan Federal University in Russia.

Professor Timmis said: “We will examine issues as diverse as local communication inspired by ants, robotic planning, power management, and how to control thousands of robots and ensure they perform tasks that humans want them to do."

“Swarm robotics is a field of significant importance at the moment, for example in areas such as environmental monitoring, and search and rescue, where we wish to deploy large numbers of robots for long periods of time. We want them to work well and effectively, without constant human interaction.

“The Information Technology session will involve leading scientists from numerous scientific disciplines from around the world discussing this issue. I am very honoured to be leading this Royal Society session, which aligns well with my own research and the challenges we are facing at York.”

Notes to editors:

  • For more information on the Frontiers of Science visit http://royalsociety.org/about-us/international/frontiers-of-science/
  • For more information on the University of York’s Department of Computer Science visit www.cs.york.ac.uk
  • For more information on the University of York’s Department of Electronics visit www.york.ac.uk/electronics
  • The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering, and medicine. The Society’s fundamental purpose, as it has been since its foundation in 1660, is to recognise, promote, and support excellence in science and to encourage the development and use of science for the benefit of humanity.

The Society’s strategic priorities emphasise its commitment to the highest quality science, to curiosity-driven research, and to the development and use of science for the benefit of society. These priorities are:

1.       Promoting science and its benefits

2.       Recognising excellence in science

3.       Supporting outstanding science

4.       Providing scientific advice for policy

5.       Fostering international and global cooperation

6.       Education and public engagement

 

For further information please visit http://royalsociety.org. Follow the Royal Society on Twitter at http://twitter.com/royalsociety or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/theroyalsociety.

 

Contact details

Caron Lett
Press Officer

Keep up to date

 Subscribe to news feeds

 Follow us on Twitter