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Agnes Noy
Early Career Research Fellow

Profile

Biography

I have a multi-disciplinary trajectory in molecular modelling within the field of biological physics. My research interests are centred in developing novel computational tools to understand and predict how global mechanical properties of complex macromolecules such as DNA and RNA are built on the basis of their atomic fluctuations, with a particular emphasis in DNA flexibility and supercoiling. Moreover, my research is focused on understanding and predicting the 3D architecture of genomes and its recognition properties on a broad range of length scales with a multi-scale approach: from atomistic and coarse-grained simulations to statistical-mechanics algorithms.  

Career

  • BSc, MSc, PhD by University of Barcelona, Spain.
  • 2018-Current: Lecturer
  • 2016-Current: EPSRC Early Career Research Fellow
  • 2011-2015: Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Physics, University of Leeds
  • 2010-2011: EMBO Long-term Fellow, Physics Department, University of Oxford
  • 2008-2009: Beatriu de Pinos Fellow, Physics Department, University of Sheffield
  • 2003-2008: Predoctoral Research Fellow, Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Barcelona, Spain

Summary of Expertise

  • Biological physics
  • Molecular modelling
  • Nucleic acids structure and recognition
  • DNA supercoiling and topology
  • 3D genomics

Honours

  • EPSRC Early Career Fellowship, 2016
  • EMBO Long-term Fellowship, 2008
  • Beatriu de Pinos Fellowship from Catalan Government, 2008
  • Predoctoral Research Fellowship from Spanish Ministry of Science, 2003
  • Undergraduate Research Scholarship from Spanish Ministry of Science, 2001

‌‌Agnes Noy

Department of Physics
University of York
Heslington
York
YO10 5DD
U.K.

agnes.noy@york.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1904 324316
Fax: +44 (0)1904 322214

Web: Personal page

Room: P/CE03

Research

Overview

I have a multi-disciplinary trajectory in molecular modelling within the field of biological physics. My research interests are centred in developing novel computational tools to understand and predict how global mechanical properties of complex macromolecules such as DNA and RNA are built on the basis of their atomic fluctuations, with a particular emphasis in DNA flexibility and supercoiling.
Moreover, my research is focus on understanding and predicting the 3D architecture of genomes and its recognition properties on a broad range of length scales with a multi-scale approach: from atomistic and coarse-grained simulations to statistical-mechanics algorithms.