About the Centre

The Centre for Hyperpolarisation in Magnetic Resonance (CHyM) is a joint research centre created by the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Psychology  at the University of York. CHyM is associated with the Hull York Medical School, the Department of Biology and the York Neuroimaging Centre. Research within CHyM focuses on the development and application of hyperpolarisation techniques in NMR and MRI to solve fundamental sensitivity issues.

From the director

Read a message from the CHyM Director, Professor Simon Duckett

Our aims

The aim of the Centre is to bring together research scientists to explore the fundamental processes that underpin hyperpolarisation techniques and then apply them in a range of solutions. These methods have the potential to address the sensitivity issues associated with NMR and MRI. In NMR applications these can be used to detect low-concentration, short-lived chemical intermediates and offer significant opportunities in the fields of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. In MRI applications, they have the potential to revolutionise clinical imaging.

The Centre has received high levels of support from the Wellcome Trust, Wolfson Foundation, University of York, EPSRC and industrial collaborators totalling in excess of £13m, in order to archive these aims. The Centre’s research has resulted in many high-impact publications

World-class facilities

The Centre is based in a purpose-built facility on the York Science Park and has a dedicated chemical laboratory, biological preparation areas and an instrument design area. The Centre also houses state-of-the-art magnetic resonance equipment including four high resolution NMR spectrometers, and a 7 T pre-clinical MRI scanner, all of which are equipped for hyperpolarisation research. Further UV-vis, IR and MS facilities are also available.

General enquiries

  • Centre for Hyperpolarisation in MR (CHyM)

    chym@york.ac.uk 

    Tel: 01904 328886

Further information

The sensitivity challenge

Solving the sensitivity challenge

What is hyperpolarisation?