Saturday classes

October

The Knave of Diamonds

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'The Knave of Diamonds', also known as 'The Jack of Diamonds' was both the name of the notorious 1910-1911 art exhibition held in Moscow, and the artists' association that existed between 1911 and 1917, and united under its banner a cohort of rebels against what was perceived as the outdated academic tradition in painting. The course shall discuss the origins and key trends of Russian Avant-Garde, whose principal exponents formed the core of the 'Knave of Diamonds'.

Elena Kashina MPhil PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 15 October 2016
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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The Easter Rising 100 Years On (FULL, waiting list available at the online store)

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The insurrection that broke out in the streets of Dublin at Easter 1916 failed, yet changed the course of Irish history. What had caused such widespread Irish disillusion with British rule? Why was the Rising so easily crushed but popular hostility to the rebels transformed into massive support for the ideal of Irish Independence by 1918? And how significant was the long-term impact of the Easter Rising on both the Irish nation and the British state?

Joseph Oakley BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 15 October 2016
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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The Medieval Castle

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From the eleventh century throughout Europe and the Holy Land, stone castles were erected which greatly impacted on medieval warfare by reducing the number of battles and increasing the number of sieges. This course will examine the design and construction of medieval castles, from the simple ‘motte and bailey’ to the most sophisticated fortresses. In addition, the course will study the strategies, tactics and weaponry employed in siege warfare.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 15 October 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Writing Short Stories (Cancelled)

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What exactly is a short story? Aimed at beginners, this day course will use creative exercises to examine the themes and characteristics that differentiate the short story from other kinds of writing. We will focus upon style, pace, characters and scene setting, with the aim of producing a short story of your own.

Rob O’Connor    BA MA CTLLS

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 22 October 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Roman Britain: A History through Coins (Cancelled)

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This course will provide an overview of the four centuries of Roman rule in Britain, illustrated by coins and the events, emperors, and usurpers that shaped them (including the devious coinage of the pirate Carausius, and the Late-Roman coin copying epidemics). We will consider how coins were made and used in the Roman period, what they meant, and how we can decipher and identify them today (with hands-on access to a wide range of genuine Roman coins).

Barry Crump BA BSc MRes

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 22 October 2016
  • Time: 10.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Living with Nature's Risk

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With the media frequently reporting global ‘natural disasters’, this course explores what influences people to live alongside ‘natural hazards’. An often-controversial topic, we will discuss whether people are constrained in their choices or motivated by potential gains that living with flooding, hurricanes, volcanoes and earthquakes often present. Drawing from a range of theories and global case studies including the recent UK flooding, this session promises opportunity for lively debate.

Jessica Roberts BSc MSc PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 22 October 2016
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Exploring Human Values: Common Sense, Moral Sense?

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In the early eighteenth century, the Reverend Francis Hutcheson suggested that moral goodness was perceived not only by the senses, but by a dedicated sensory modality. More than a hundred years later, Charles Darwin developed this idea and argued that it was the moral sense that provided the only clear-cut distinction between man and beast. This class will explore the relation between perception and morality, drawing on historical and contemporary accounts of what it means to see goodness.

Rafe McGregor  PhD PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 22 October 2016
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Strathclyde: The Last Kingdom of the Britons? (FULL - waiting list only available at the online store)

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After the Romans left, many Romano-British kingdoms emerged and Strathclyde alone survived the Anglo-Saxon invasions. Although attacked by Vikings in the ninth century, it was not until just before the Norman Conquest that the independent British Kingdom of Strathclyde was absorbed into the Gaelic Kingdom of Scotland. This day school examines the origins of the British Kingdom of Strathclyde and its final absorption into the Kingdom of the Scots. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 22 October 2016
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Plotting and Planning a Novel

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If you're writing a novel, or have an idea for one, this day will help you to hone your plot. You may have just the idea and want to develop that, or perhaps you have started the novel and are not sure where to go next - this workshop will offer ways of thinking and practical exercises to help you develop ideas and put together a workable plot.

Sue Cooper MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 29 October 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Life After Death: Mummies and Mummification in the Americas

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In the Andes, mummification preserved power rather than memorialising it. Desert coast and high mountains allowed natural mummification. 7,000 years ago, the Chinchorro people learned to mummify their dead, 2,000 years before the ancient Egyptians. By AD 1200, Andean people placed ancestors in burial towers and made human sacrifices on high mountains (Llullaillaco), and the mummies remained, in an important way, alive. We shall look at the processes and belief systems behind these practices, with reference to Juanita, sarcophagi at Chachapoya, and elsewhere.

Heather Brothwell MA MA LLB

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 29 October 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Art History in a Day (FULL - waiting list available at the online store, second cohort available)

Enrol and pay online

Want to know your Renaissance from your Rococo? Rembrandt from Rossetti, Renoir and Rockwell? If so, this is the course for you. Together we will take a high-speed romp through some the most famous artistic styles and artists, explore how to identify them, and discuss what you might say when faced with them.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 29 October 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Nov/Dec

Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot (FULL - waiting list available at the online store. Second cohort available)

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Five minutes before midnight on 4th November, a cloaked and spurred man, John Johnson of Nidderdale (aka Guy Fawkes) unlocked a cellar door underneath the House of Lords. In his pockets were matches, ready to ignite 36 barrels of gunpowder hidden beneath firewood in the cellar. This day school unravels the story of Guy Fawkes and how he became drawn into the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Why do we burn Guy Fawkes alone of all the 13 conspirators - is it because he was a York man? It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 05 November 2016
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The Secret Life of Servants (FULL - waiting list available at the online store. Second cohort available)

Enrol and pay online

Who employed servants, what did they do, and what really went on downstairs? Looking at the history of servants from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, this course will answer these questions and more using original sources to examine the daily life of servants, from what they wore to their duties, positions and relationships.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 05 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot (second cohort)

Enrol and pay online

Five minutes before midnight on 4th November, a cloaked and spurred man, John Johnson of Nidderdale (aka Guy Fawkes) unlocked a cellar door underneath the House of Lords. In his pockets were matches, ready to ignite 36 barrels of gunpowder hidden beneath firewood in the cellar. This day school unpicks the story of Guy Fawkes and how he became drawn into the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Why do we burn Guy Fawkes alone of all the 13 conspirators - is it because he was a York man? It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 12 November 2016
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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All You Need is Love

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Love - the gaining and losing of it, the craving and fear of it - is a central theme in poetry. This course explores various manifestations of love as well as its effects on both lover and the object of desire, as expressed in poetry. Is the ability to love a defining characteristic of being human? Is love a corruption or a blessing? Do our ideas of love - romantic, physical, ideological - change over time? No previous experience with either poetry or love required.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 05 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Art History in a Day (Second Cohort FULL - waiting list available at the online store. Third cohort available)

Enrol and pay online

Want to know your Renaissance from your Rococo? Rembrandt from Rossetti, Renoir and Rockwell? If so, this is the course for you. Together we will take a high-speed romp through some the most famous artistic styles and artists, explore how to identify them, and discuss what you might say when faced with them.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 12 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Holy Warriors: Medieval Military Orders

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Military orders were confraternities of knights, living under a monastic rule, who were originally charged with the protection of pilgrims in the Holy Land in times of the Crusades. Controversial from the beginning, the military orders attracted support and contempt from contemporaries. This course will study the origins, rise, and demise of the military orders, focusing especially on the history of the Knights Templar and the Knights of St John of the Hospital, but also examining minor, regional orders.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 12 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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An Introduction to Art Appreciation (FULL - waiting list available at the online store)

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'I like it'...'I don’t like it'. Most of us can get this far in talking about art but ‘Why do I like it?’ is a far more challenging question. This course will create a framework for thinking and talking about painting, sculpture, architecture and design. We will develop the method through examining a wide range of works. Finally, we will grapple with the phenomenon of modern art to see whether we need to find new criteria for judgment.

Fiona Fitzgerald BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 12 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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What is Knowledge?

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Academic disciplines have particular cultures, identities, aspirations and ways of doing their business. This course examines these foundational assumptions, the way they are expressed and how they shape what we know. From philosophical analysis to cultural critique and from the language of the sciences to the language of the humanities, we will consider knowledge structures and learning in the broadest sense. We will examine the credentials of the different disciplines, their points of shared agreement and their points of departure to develop a deeper understanding of the progress and shifting architecture of knowledge.

John Issitt BA BSc PGCE PhD National Teaching Fellow

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 12 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Keep Your Hair On! An Exploration of Hair in Opera (Cancelled)

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Opera is full of hair symbolism: in Saint-Saëns’s Samson and Delilah it signifies strength; in Korngold’s Die Tote Stadt the hero strangles his lover with his dead wife’s hair; Debussy’s heroine lets her hair down for love in Pelléas et Mélisande; Mary Magdalen uses hers as a towel, and hair features in many other operas, including one by Wagner’s son Siegfried, by Franco Leoni and Richard Strauss - not to mention barbers and composers’ wigs! All illustrated by DVD and CD.

Roger Witts BA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 12 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Using Maps for Local and Family History (FULL - waiting list available at the online store)

Enrol and pay online

Britain is the best-mapped country in the world, and we have a treasure-trove of surviving maps. We will explore the bird’s-eye town views and the county and estate maps of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will also examine later enclosure, tithe and Ordnance Survey maps. While looking across Britain, we will focus particularly on examples from Yorkshire. Maps give a sense of place and an extra dimension to your research, as well as being fascinating and fun to use. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

John Lee BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 12 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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An Introduction to Shales and Fracking

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From Britain to Bulgaria, Ukraine to the USA, shale gas and fracking seem to be constantly in the news. But what are shales, why do they (sometimes) contain gas, and what is the fracking process? This short course will provide an introduction to the topic, explain some of the key terms and concepts, and discuss the scientific research that is investigating the risks and rewards of fracking.

Liam Herringshaw BSc PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 19 November 2016
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Scheming Women in Greek Law Court Speeches

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Murderers, cheaters and liars, or innocent victims of false accusations from men trying to avoid the blame themselves? In this one day course we will consider the laws and conventions set out for women in Classical Athens and the court cases brought against a few women who supposedly transgressed those rules. We will also consider the arguments brought forward considering that women in Classical Greece could not even attend, never mind speak at, court cases.

Caron Downes BA PGCE MEd

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 19 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Art History in a Day (Third cohort)

Enrol and pay online

Want to know your Renaissance from your Rococo? Rembrandt from Rossetti, Renoir and Rockwell? If so, this is the course for you. Together we will take a high-speed romp through some the most famous artistic styles and artists, explore how to identify them, and discuss what you might say when faced with them.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 26 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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An Introduction to Pottery in Archaeology

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Archaeology in Britain means pottery. From complete vessels to broken sherds, pottery presents a great wealth of data and information about the past, but it is frequently misunderstood and underused. We will consider the role of pottery in archaeology, together with a detailed examination of pottery from Roman to medieval times in Yorkshire, with hands-on access to genuine archaeological finds and replicas.

Barry Crump BA BSc MRes

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 26 November 2016
  • Time: 10.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Flowing to Power? Water in the Twenty-First Century

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Beyond H2O, water is a social, political, and historical entity that cannot be separated from the story of humanity. In the twenty-first century, the meaning of water is contested across the globe. This course traces the winding path of water and society from its philosophical history, through many societal upheavals, and into the numerous debates and political struggles taking place at a local and international scale which affect the lives of millions. Something crucial is at stake: the future of water.

James Smith BA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 26 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Restorative Justice: What it is and Why it Works

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Many people have heard of restorative justice and know that it is being increasingly used in both the criminal justice system and in school behaviour management. Yet, despite evidence suggesting that this approach is highly effective in reducing repeat offences, there tends to be a conception that this is a ‘soft touch’. This course will aim to counteract this view, by introducing you to how restorative justice works and covering the psychological underpinnings of why this approach is so effective.

Laura Oxley BSc MEd MBPsS

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 26 November 2016
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Women, Railways and Religion in Victorian Britain (Cancelled) 

This course explores the relationships between women, railways and religion in the Victorian period. There were striking differences between established religious practice and the new technology of railway expansion, yet as this course will illustrate, similarities between these two important areas of Victorian life can be found. Of particular interest was the work carried out by lots of ordinary women, as they worked to take religion to the thousands of men employed in the Victorian railway industry.

Anne Mallery BA MA PGDip

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 26 November 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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History of the King's Manor (first cohort FULL - waiting list available at the online store, second cohort available)

Enrol and pay online

The history of the King's Manor reflects the history of the city of York. Once a proud monastic Abbotts' lodgings, the King's Manor housed the officers of the crown and became the centre of monarchical power and control in the North under the Tudors and Stuarts. In the eighteenth century, high society whiled away the winter months at the King's Manor gambling and dancing, whilst in the nineteenth century the buildings housed a school. This course, based at the King's Manor, will trace the history of the building and the people who lived and worked there.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 26 November 2016
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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History of the King's Manor (second cohort FULL - waiting list available at the online store, third cohort available)

The history of the King's Manor reflects the history of the city of York. Once a proud monastic Abbotts' lodgings, the King's Manor housed the officers of the crown and became the centre of monarchical power and control in the North under the Tudors and Stuarts. In the eighteenth century, high society whiled away the winter months at the King's Manor gambling and dancing, whilst in the nineteenth century the buildings housed a school. This course, based at the King's Manor, will trace the history of the building and the people who lived and worked there.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 26 November 2016
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Abelard and Heloise: Between Heaven and Hell

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Arguably the most brilliant master of the twelfth century fell in love with a no-less brilliant student, who reciprocated his love. Theirs, however, is not only a story of romance but one marked with tragedy. This one-day course aims to study the lives of Abelard and Heloise against the backdrop of the cultural changes during the 'Twelfth-Century Renaissance'. The focus will be on the letters they wrote to each other and on their conceptions of love, friendship and learning.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 03 December 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The Battle of the Somme: Unnecessary Bloodbath or Crucial Victory?

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When Haig's 'New Armies' attacked the German lines on the Somme in July 1916 they suffered unimaginable first-day casualties in a bloodbath which became emblematic of the suffering and waste of the Great War. However many historians now claim that the Somme was actually a turning-point in the ultimate victory of Britain’s citizen armies. This day course will look at both sides of the debate and attempt to clarify the historical significance of this iconic battle.

Joseph Oakley BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 03 December 2016
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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The Weight of Images and Words: Social Realism

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Mid-nineteenth century British paintings and writings tell us much about the society of the period. This class will consider the political agency with which forms of visual and verbal representation were invested by those artists and writers - including WP Frith, Augustus Egg, Charles Dickens and Elizabeth Gaskell – who sought to confront contemporary audiences with the realities and iniquities. Together, we will explore issues of class, race, gender equality, anthropology, science and modernity that emerge from these works.

Katie JT Herrington PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 03 December 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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How to Understand the Qur'an

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Although easy to find, the Qur'an can be a difficult book to understand for readers approaching it for the first time. It is not arranged chronologically or by theme, and the moral, legal, social or economic themes of individual chapters are often interrupted by passing references, for example, to stories familiar from the Bible. So how should the Qur’an be read? That is the question this course aims to answer, and it offers a useful, but optional, introduction to the later, ‘Mysterious and Obscure Passages in the Qur’an’ course.

Roderic Vassie BA PGCE MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 03 December 2016
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The Conservation of York’s Historic Stained Glass - CANCELLED

Stained glass, although extremely fragile, has been one of the most enduring and popular heritage assets of the city of York. Once repaired by plumbers, glaziers and restorers, today its care is undertaken by conservation specialists. This lecture will explore how professionals work today to preserve stained glass for future generations. It will explore how art historical research and modern scientific methods blend with the stained glass craft skill little-changed for hundreds of years.

Dr Emma Wells (new tutor)

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 December 2016 (new date)
  • Time: 10am-1pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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The Secret Life of Servants (Second cohort)

Enrol and pay online

Who employed servants, what did they do, and what really went on downstairs? Looking at the history of servants from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, this course will answer these questions and more using original sources to examine the daily life of servants, from what they wore to their duties, positions and relationships.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 December 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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A Writer's Workout

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Brush up your creative writing skills with a day of intensive (but fun!) writing exercises. If you've not written for a while and want to kick-start ideas and refresh your technique, or if you are a complete beginner and want to see what creative writing is about, this day will get you going. The exercises are designed to help you practise the key techniques you need for writing successful fiction - including how to develop ideas, build memorable characters, create tension and write good dialogue. It's a day to flex and tone your writing muscles!

Sue Cooper MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 December 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Incas of Peru: An Introduction 

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In 1532, Francisco Pizarro discovered a highly-organised civilisation in the high Andes. He was dazzled by huge quantities of beautifully-crafted gold and silver. The Inca began as a group of 40,000 people in the Cuzco valley, who built and expanded the largest empire in pre-Columbian South America in a remarkably short time. How did they do it, without the horse, the wheel or an alphabet? We will look at aspects of Inca development and social organisation, using archaeology, chronicles and projected illustrations.

Heather Brothwell MA MA LLB

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 December 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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‘Slate-Grey Rain and Polished Euphoniums’: Brass Bands, the Working Class and the North (c1840-1914)

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In spite of being a national movement, brass bands are accepted - almost without question - as a cliché of northern working-class identity. Writing in The Times in 1974, Peter Hennessy wrote: ‘of all the manifestations of working-class culture, nothing is more certain than a brass band to bring on an attack of the George Orwells’. We will examine regional archival material to show how and why this powerful stereotype of class and region was invented from c1840-1914.

Stephen Etheridge GLCM MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 December 2016
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Historic Photographic Processes and How to Preserve Their Images

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John Herschel coined the word photograph in 1839, based on the Greek, meaning 'drawing with light'. Often unique objects, photographs are powerful in many ways, used frequently to capture the personal memories of their owners. Students will develop a practical understanding of how to care for pre-digital photographs. The course will give a brief introduction to the most common historical photographic processes and consider methods through which they can be cared for and preserved.

Tracy Wilcockson BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 December 2016
  • Time: 10am-1pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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January

Using Maps for Local and Family History (2nd cohort)

Enrol and pay online

Britain is the best-mapped country in the world, and we have a treasure-trove of surviving maps. We will explore the bird’s-eye town views and the county and estate maps of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will also examine later enclosure, tithe and Ordnance Survey maps. While looking across Britain, we will focus particularly on examples from Yorkshire. Maps give a sense of place and an extra dimension to your research, as well as being fascinating and fun to use. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

John Lee BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 21 January 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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History of the King's Manor: Third Cohort (FULL - waiting list available at the online store, fourth cohort available below)

The history of the King's Manor reflects the history of the city of York. Once a proud monastic Abbotts' lodgings, the King's Manor housed the officers of the crown and became the centre of monarchical power and control in the North under the Tudors and Stuarts. In the eighteenth century, high society whiled away the winter months at the King's Manor gambling and dancing, whilst in the nineteenth century the buildings housed a school. This course, based at the King's Manor, will trace the history of the building and the people who lived and worked there.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 21 January 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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History of the King's Manor: Fourth cohort (Fifth class available on 11 February 2017)

The history of the King's Manor reflects the history of the city of York. Once a proud monastic Abbotts' lodgings, the King's Manor housed the officers of the crown and became the centre of monarchical power and control in the North under the Tudors and Stuarts. In the eighteenth century, high society whiled away the winter months at the King's Manor gambling and dancing, whilst in the nineteenth century the buildings housed a school. This course, based at the King's Manor, will trace the history of the building and the people who lived and worked there.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 28 January 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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From Spark to Page: Developing Ideas in Fiction Writing

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Ever thought of writing a novel? Ideas for stories can come from a variety of sources and a single moment of imagination could spark an idea for the next blockbuster. But what’s the next stage? How do you get your ideas down on paper? This day course, designed for beginners, will take you step-by-step through the process of beginning your story, looking at outlining plots and characters, and how you can turn one great idea into a piece of creative writing.

Rob O’Connor    BA MA CTLLS

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 28 January 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The World of Bede (FULL - waiting list available at the online store, second cohort available)

Venerable Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People tells the story of the Anglo-Saxon conversion and provides the reader with a portrait of seventh and eighth century England. Bede’s partiality for Roman traditions - as opposed to Ionan ones - is evident, as it is his aim to show the Anglo-Saxons as united, instead of operating as competing kingdoms. This one-day course will examine early medieval England as Bede interprets it, and contrast his view against archaeological and historical evidence.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 28 January 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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February

Markets and Fairs Over Eight Centuries

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Markets and fairs have formed part of English life for centuries, but how much do we know about their development? Using extracts from historical documents, we will explore markets and fairs from early written records such as the Domesday Book and market charters into the modern period of agricultural shows, car boot sales and farmers’ markets. We will explore markets and fairs across England but focus particularly on examples from Yorkshire. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

John Lee BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 04 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Women at Work: Women on the Railway in The Great War (Cancelled)

As more and more men left Britain’s railway companies to join the Front during the First World War, women took over their work in many areas of the industry. This course will look at the work which they did and how they were treated by their new employers. We will use a variety of illustrations to show the sometimes surprising ways in which the railway companies portrayed women‘s roles in the war effort through the pages of their company magazines.

Anne Mallery BA MA PGDip

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 04 February 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The World of Bede (Second Cohort)

Enrol and pay online

Venerable Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People tells the story of the Anglo-Saxon conversion and provides the reader with a portrait of seventh and eighth century England. Bede’s partiality for Roman traditions - as opposed to Ionan ones - is evident, as it is his aim to show the Anglo-Saxons as united, instead of operating as competing kingdoms. This one-day course will examine early medieval England as Bede interprets it, and contrast his view against archaeological and historical evidence.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 4 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Before the Storm: England (1910-14)

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The outbreak of war in 1914 ended an era of social stability, patrician government and national self-assurance. This day course will examine the extent to which the last five years of peace foreshadowed the new century of uncertainty, focusing on a range of threats to the status quo including the emergence of a new class consciousness, the constitutional crisis of 1909-11, trade unionism and industrial unrest after 1910, the imminence of Civil War in Ireland, and the radicalism of the Suffragettes.

Joseph Oakley BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 04 February 2017
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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The Normans (FULL - second class on 18 February)

The Normans played a major role in European history. Famous for their martial spirit, they conquered vast lands both in Europe and the Middle East. This course aims to study the development of these remarkable people from their Viking origins to their establishment as Kings of England, of Sicily, and as Princes of Antioch, in the Holy Land. We will consider textual, visual, and architectural evidence and focus on the political, military and cultural changes that they brought to their new dominions.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Classical Greek Tragedy

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Greek tragedy has influenced theatre and plays from antiquity to modern productions; this one-day course will consider the plot, staging and characterisation that featured in Classical Greek tragedy. We will look at translations of some of the key scenes in the plays of each of the three major tragic playwrights and consider how they used the tools available to them.

Caron Downes BA PGCE MEd

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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A Day with Lord Byron

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Romantic, rebel, rake: Byron embodied 'the spirit of the age' in both his poetry and scandalous life. Described as 'mad, bad and dangerous to know', his affairs threaten to overshadow the accomplishment of his poetry. His letters are among the most sparkling and revealing in the English language as they cast an unforgiving eye over poetry, politics, love and Regency life. We will reveal the real Lord Byron and consider his legacy and the creation of 'the Byronic hero'. Not for the faint hearted.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Art History in 100 Paintings (c20,000 to 1900) (FULL)

This course aims to enable you to make sense of art works you might encounter in a gallery. Together, we will fit 100 paintings into a time line of historical events, exploring changing styles and a host of stories which exist behind each piece. Using art appreciation skills learnt from the day, we will examine works in a virtual tour of a major gallery that come from other times and places. This will enable students to then create their own personal ‘Gallery of 100 Paintings’.

Fiona Fitzgerald BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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History of the King's Manor: Fifth Cohort

Enrol and pay online

The history of the King's Manor reflects the history of the city of York. Once a proud monastic Abbotts' lodgings, the King's Manor housed the officers of the crown and became the centre of monarchical power and control in the North under the Tudors and Stuarts. In the eighteenth century, high society whiled away the winter months at the King's Manor gambling and dancing, whilst in the nineteenth century the buildings housed a school. This course, based at the King's Manor, will trace the history of the building and the people who lived and worked there.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 February 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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‘The Play’s the Thing'… But What Kind of Thing? (Cancelled)

This one-day course guides you through the basis of playwriting, focusing on structure, characterisation, theme and plot. Students will undertake several writing exercises to act as a springboard for creating their own play, with tips given on getting drama produced, touching on outlets like local venues and Edinburgh Fringe. Suitable for beginners and more experienced writers wishing to reinforce their expertise.

Helen Shay CertEd BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Simon de Montfort and the Origins of Parliament

Enrol and pay online

In 1264, after being defeated at the Battle of Lewes, King Henry III was forced by Simon de Montfort to call a parliament which included not only the great barons, but also citizens from the major towns in England. This was the very beginnings of what became our parliamentary democracy today. This day school examines the causes and consequences of the baronial war between Simon de Montfort and Henry III and the origins of parliament; it is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 February 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The Victorian Restorations of England's Cathedrals and Churches

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This course will explore the reaction to the Victorian restorations of England's cathedrals and churches. It will explore both the antagonists and protagonists that provided the foundations for the heritage legislation and organisations in the UK today. From James Wyatt to John Ruskin, and Augustus Pugin to William Morris, it will explore the social and political backdrop that both supported and fought the conservation ideals of a radical few.

Tracy Wilcockson BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 February 2017
  • Time: 10am-1pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Artistic Expression during the Reign of Ivan IV the Terrible (1530-1584) (Cancelled)

This course will look at official art production during the reign of Ivan IV, the Terrible. Ivan IV was Russia’s first officially crowned and anointed Tsar (1547), and this change of status necessitated the creation of a new imagery in keeping with the contemporary protocol of visual diplomatic discourse. Narratives of dynastic continuities, of the legitimacy of power and of sovereignty were being consciously developed, frequently replacing traditional iconographies. Regalia and symbols of authority shall further be considered, to conclude with the architectural landmarks of the period.

Elena Kashina MPhil PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 February 2017
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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The Normans (Second cohort)

Enrol and pay online

The Normans played a major role in European history. Famous for their martial spirit, they conquered vast lands both in Europe and the Middle East. This course aims to study the development of these remarkable people from their Viking origins to their establishment as Kings of England, of Sicily, and as Princes of Antioch, in the Holy Land. We will consider textual, visual, and architectural evidence and focus on the political, military and cultural changes that they brought to their new dominions.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Medieval York through the Eyes of William Snawsell

Enrol and pay online

William Snawsell was a key figure in fifteenth-century York, as a silversmith, alderman, City Chamberlain, Sheriff, Lord Mayor, and tenant of Barley Hall. Living through the reigns of four kings, William was at the crisis meetings following the death of Richard III, and was amongst the first to declare loyalty to Henry VII. By studying historical documents, genealogies, archaeology and buildings we can gain a fascinating personal perspective into medieval York. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Barry Crump BA BSc MRes

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 February 2017 (Please note change of date)
  • Time: 10.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Bringing Children's Stories to Life: Writing 9-12 Fiction

Enrol and pay online

This day course is for anyone who wants to write children's fiction for nine to twelve year olds, but isn't sure where to start. Using illustrative examples and writing exercises, you will look at the process of crafting an engaging plot, developing characters, finding the right inspiration, and approaching agents and publishers. Along the way, you will have the chance to ask questions about your own projects, and develop ideas on how to make your writing a success.

Andrew Parrott BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-1.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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The Knights Hospitaller: Warriors and Builders

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One of the most successful military orders, the Knights of St John of Jerusalem, grew in power and prestige in the time of the Crusades, after which they moved from the Holy Land, first to Rhodes and then to Malta. This course will examine the history of the order from its origins to the fortification of Valletta, Malta, in the sixteenth century. The knights’ roles as warriors and builders of fortifications will be at the centre of the course discussions.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Maya Art and Architecture

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Maya civilisation flourished on the vast jungle lowlands of the Yucatán peninsula and the highlands of Guatemala and Honduras. Their artists created paintings, sculptures and monuments that have intrigued and delighted people ever since. Brilliant and distinctive art at Bonampak, Calakmul and San Bartolo, use of the corbelled vault, exquisite structures at Palenque, Chichén Itzá, Yaxchilán, Tikal and Copán are some examples of their extraordinary achievements.

Heather Brothwell MA MA LLB

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 February 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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A Geological History of Britain

Enrol and pay online

Britain is the home of the science of geology, and with very good reason. From staggeringly ancient rocks in north-west Scotland to the Ice Age sediments of south-eastern England, the UK preserves almost three billion years of Earth history. Every period of geological time is visible in this tiny island. In this course we will delve into the prehistory of Britain, showing how life here evolved, how our climate and environment has changed, and how Scotland was once on a separate continent. Though not compulsory, a scientific or geological background would be beneficial to those taking the course.

 

Liam Herringshaw BSc PhD

 

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 March 2017 (please note new date)
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

 

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March

An Introduction to Pre-Raphaelitism: The Early Decades

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Reflecting on Tate’s blockbuster 2012 exhibition, this course examines Pre-Raphaelitism in terms of the famous and popular art of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood proper and its development in the hands of ‘the other Pre-Raphaelites’. It will consider the work of Rossetti, Millais, Holman Hunt, Collinson and Woolner but also the work of various painters associated with Pre-Raphaelitism, including women artists and the ‘Pre-Raphaelite’ camera. Through encounters with images of artworks, you will develop an ability to recognise and understand Pre-Raphaelite paintings.

Katie JT Herrington PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 04 March 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Sir Frederic Leighton (1830-1896) and the Arab Hall at 2 Holland Park Road

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Born of a wealthy Scarborough family, Leighton spent his early life abroad, before becoming an established Victorian painter of classical subjects. President of the Royal Academy, he was a member of an élite group of artists who promoted The Cult of Beauty. Throughout his life, Leighton also combined his love for drawing with his passion for collecting decorative art; in 1877, he started a project to build the Arab extension to his house-studio in Holland Park Road. This course will examine the interior of the house and will look at sources of inspiration and connections between this small but beautiful ‘Palace of Art’ and the art scene of the late nineteenth century.

Teresa Fazio-Gannon MPhil AMA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 04 March 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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King Arthur: From Legend to Myth

Enrol and pay online

Who was Arthur and did he really exist at all? Of the many sixth-century Arthurs, which one is the Arthur? Where did the Round Table, Excalibur, and Lancelot come from? Who was the Green Knight and why did Gawain have to chop his head off? This day school will examine the evidence for an historical Arthur, the different contenders, and how the story was transmitted and changed into a tale for all times. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 04 March 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Exploring Human Values: Better Art, Better Human Being? (Cancelled)

The relationship between beauty and virtue was uncontroversial in the early modern period and Friedrich Schiller became famous for his argument that beautiful art could improve both the individual human being and human society in general. The idea remains popular and has been taken up by the likes of Matthew Arnold, Richard Rorty, and Martha Nussbaum. This class will explore the relation between art and value, beginning with the different ways in which works of art can be called ‘good’.

Rafe McGregor PhD PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 March 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Reading the Bayeux Tapestry (FULL - second class on 25 March)

The Bayeux Tapestry celebrates the conquest of England by William, Duke of Normandy. Viking-like ships, Norman cavalry and Saxon foot-soldiers illustrate the exploits of William the Conqueror and King Harold in their fight for the throne of England. This one-day course aims to study the tapestry in depth. First, the political and cultural context of 1066 England will be analysed and, against this backdrop, every scene in the tapestry will be ‘read’.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 March 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The Music and Politics of Bob Dylan

Enrol and pay online

Bob Dylan shaped and reflected the music and politics of the 1960s in equal measure: as an active member of the civil rights movement he was making history, whilst his songs reflect the experience of a generation. Taking this well-known period as a starting point, this one-day session will explore the music, politics and life of Dylan, from protest songs to Christmas covers, unpicking the long career of this demigod of music.

Martin Scheuregger BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 March 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Introduction to the Icelandic Sagas (FULL - waiting list available at the online store)

An extraordinary blend of fact, myth and fiction, peopled with heroes, outlaws, lovers and the occasional troll, the sagas contain some of the richest vernacular writing of the Middle Ages. In this course, we will focus on a single saga - The Saga of Gunnlaug Serpent-Tongue - to explore the context in which the texts were composed, their unique prose style, their importance for Scandinavian and English identity, and their relationships with folklore and contemporary European literature. No prior knowledge is required.

Katrina Attwood BA MA MSc PGCE PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 March 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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A Geological History of Britain

Enrol and pay online

Britain is the home of the science of geology, and with very good reason. From staggeringly ancient rocks in north-west Scotland to the Ice Age sediments of south-eastern England, the UK preserves almost three billion years of Earth history. Every period of geological time is visible in this tiny island. In this course we will delve into the prehistory of Britain, showing how life here evolved, how our climate and environment has changed, and how Scotland was once on a separate continent. Though not compulsory, a scientific or geological background would be beneficial to those taking the course.

Liam Herringshaw BSc PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 11 March 2017 (please note new date)
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

 

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Getting Creative with Steampunk (Cancelled)

Whether you're Goth, geek or green (or none of the above), the fascination of steampunk can inform any writing - poetry, prose or drama. Discover the origins of this popular genre, experience varieties of steampunk, and play with its potential under the guidance of tutors versed in creative writing and civil engineering/steampunk activities. This one-day course covers history and conventions, exploring possibilities in this genre. Students will create the genesis of a fantasy steampunk world and a written piece which could potentially be developed further.

Carolyn Dougherty BA MA MS PE and Helen Shay CertEd BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 March 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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What's in a Surname?

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Ever wondered about the origins of Yorkshire surnames? Can all surnames tell us where people came from, what their nicknames were, or how they worked? Who chose the first names for children and how have fashions in first names changed over the centuries? This course will examine how and when surnames evolved including occupational surnames, nicknames and geographical surnames. From Cerdic and Aethelflaed, to Marmaduke and Violet, we will also examine changing fashions in first names. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 March 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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An Introduction to Archaeological Finds from Prehistoric Britain (Cancelled)

 

This day session will explore Prehistoric Britain through archaeological ‘small finds’ - including flint and stone tools, objects crafted from bone and antler, and early pottery - covering the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age. We will consider technology, form and function, context and meaning (including phenomenology), with a particular focus on the manufacture and use of stone tools (and how to identify them), and hunter-gatherer activity at the site of Star Carr.

Barry Crump BA BSc MRes

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 March 2017
  • Time: 10.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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1956: A Momentous Year Revisited (Cancelled)

 

This day course examines the significance of a momentous year. In Russia, Khrushchev denounced the iconic Stalin, visited Britain and enjoyed tea with the Queen. There were popular revolts against Communist dictatorships in Poland and Hungary, while in Cuba, Castro launched his revolution. In Egypt, Nasser seized the Anglo-French owned Suez Canal, while US pressure blocked armed intervention, signalling the end of Britain as a great power. And as the Arms Race gathered pace, CND marched for the first time.

Joseph Oakley BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 18 March 2017
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Aztecs of Mexico: An Introduction

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In 1519, Spanish soldiers stumbled on Tenochtitlán, capital city of the Aztec empire and the largest in the pre-Hispanic New World. Bernal Díaz del Castillo wrote, 'we saw things unseen, nor ever dreamed'. How did a wandering tribe of Mexica from the north become such a highly sophisticated empire, with kings, royal courts, marketplaces and detailed scientific and technical knowledge of their priests and artisans? We will explore aspects of this fascinating indigenous civilisation through pre-Contact codices, written accounts and illustrations.

Heather Brothwell MA MA LLB

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 March 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The History of Fancy Dress

Enrol and pay online

From fifteenth century Venetian carnivals, through the pleasure gardens of the eighteenth century, to the Victorian costume ball, this course charts the history and enduring popularity of fancy dress. This one-day school will focus on original descriptions and images, using them to recreate who wore what and why.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 March 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Soils: What They Tell Us

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Soil, particularly ‘healthy’ soil, is a basic human necessity for growing crops and feeding animals. Soil is, however, a complex organism that displays different characteristics within different areas of the world and can react to human manipulation. This one-day course, through a series of practical sessions, will provide some insight into the development of soils, their structure and the different impacts mankind can have on them. No previous knowledge of soil is necessary. It is anticipated that this course will take place at the King’s Manor.

Carol Lang BSc PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 March 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Medieval York through the Eyes of William Snawsell (second cohort)

Enrol and pay online

William Snawsell was a key figure in fifteenth-century York, as a silversmith, alderman, City Chamberlain, Sheriff, Lord Mayor, and tenant of Barley Hall. Living through the reigns of four kings, William was at the crisis meetings following the death of Richard III, and was amongst the first to declare loyalty to Henry VII. By studying historical documents, genealogies, archaeology and buildings we can gain a fascinating personal perspective into medieval York. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Barry Crump BA BSc MRes

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 March 2017
  • Time: 10.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Reading the Bayeux Tapestry (Second cohort)

Enrol and pay online

The Bayeux Tapestry celebrates the conquest of England by William, Duke of Normandy. Viking-like ships, Norman cavalry and Saxon foot-soldiers illustrate the exploits of William the Conqueror and King Harold in their fight for the throne of England. This one-day course aims to study the tapestry in depth. First, the political and cultural context of 1066 England will be analysed and, against this backdrop, every scene in the tapestry will be ‘read’.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 25 March 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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April/May

'We're Not in Kansas Anymore': Creating Engaging Worlds in Fiction Writing (Cancelled)

What is 'world building' when it comes to writing fiction? How do you connect all the individual scenes within your narrative? How do you write descriptions of locations that are both engaging and realistic? This day workshop will provide you with the tools you need to create realistic settings which your characters can inhabit, as well as showing you how you can develop your own imaginative worlds. Suitable for writers of any ability.

Rob O’Connor BA MA CTLLS

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 22 April 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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William the Conqueror: The Conquest of York and the Harrying of the North (FULL, second cohort 29 April below)

In 1066, William the Conqueror won the Battle of Hastings, but this was only the beginning of the conquest of England. In 1069 York was ravaged by invasions from Scandinavia and rose in rebellion against the Normans. William the Conqueror retaliated viciously, Harrying the North, slaughtering livestock and burning seedcorn, and built a second castle in the city of York. This course examines the Norman conquest of York, the Harrying of the North and the impact of the conquest on the city. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 22 April 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Medieval Warriors (c800-1500)

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What did Charlemagne and Joan of Arc have in common? Was William Marshall comparable with King Alfred the Great? Not only could medieval warriors fight bravely, but they were also charismatic leaders and clever political negotiators; this course will examine the art and craft of paradigmatic medieval warriors - their personal qualities and skills, and also their arms and armour - from the age of Charlemagne to the Wars of the Roses.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 29 April 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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William the Conqueror: The Conquest of York and the Harrying of the North (SECOND COHORT)

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In 1066, William the Conqueror won the Battle of Hastings, but this was only the beginning of the conquest of England. In 1069 York was ravaged by invasions from Scandinavia and rose in rebellion against the Normans. William the Conqueror retaliated viciously, Harrying the North, slaughtering livestock and burning seedcorn, and built a second castle in the city of York. This course examines the Norman conquest of York, the Harrying of the North and the impact of the conquest on the city. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 29 April 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Art Nouveau (FULL - third class 27 May)

Art Nouveau was the response to an age, a diverse and wide-ranging artistic movement that spanned art, architecture, theatre, dance and the decorative arts, reflecting an era of rapid social, political and technological change. In the morning, the course will consider the development of the movement and examine some of its most prominent practitioners, placing them in a historical and artistic context. In the afternoon, we will head into York to find some surviving examples of Art Nouveau. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 29 April 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Monsters in the Margins

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Whether under beds, hidden in cupboards or in unexplored lands, monsters have always existed in the margins. Nowhere is this more evident than in medieval art. From the corners of manuscripts to the edges of world maps, the medieval imagination was overflowing with monsters. Through encounters with these varied creatures, the course will also explore much wider cultural questions. What is a monster? How can you identify one? And why do monsters still have such a lasting appeal?

Karen Brett BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 29 April 2017
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Writing and Pitching Features

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How do you turn an idea into a feature for newspapers or magazines? In this one-day course, we'll explore how to 'explode' ideas, how to shape your feature, and how to pitch it to publications. The course is led by a former writer and editor on national women's magazines and will be a lively day of interaction and writing to stimulate your inner journalist.

Sue Cooper MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 06 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Introduction to the Icelandic Sagas (SECOND COHORT)

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An extraordinary blend of fact, myth and fiction, peopled with heroes, outlaws, lovers and the occasional troll, the sagas contain some of the richest vernacular writing of the Middle Ages. In this course, we will focus on a single saga - The Saga of Gunnlaug Serpent-Tongue - to explore the context in which the texts were composed, their unique prose style, their importance for Scandinavian and English identity, and their relationships with folklore and contemporary European literature. No prior knowledge is required.

Katrina Attwood BA MA MSc PGCE PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 6 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Richard III: Yorkshire Hero or Tyrant?

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Was Richard III really a villainous hunchback - or is he a victim of Shakespearian exaggeration? Did Richard III really kill his nephews in cold blood to gain the throne - or was this simply Tudor propaganda? Was he a good lord and, if so, why did York alone mourn his passing at the Battle of Bosworth? This day school examines the career and reputation of Richard III and how his short reign has been interpreted. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 06 May 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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'The Whore of Babylon': How Corrupt was the English Church on the Eve of the Reformation?

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Was the sixteenth-century English Church corrupt and deeply unpopular? Were too many parish clergy absentee and worldly, monks and nuns lascivious and ignorant, bishops more concerned with profit than with prayer? If so, the rapid success of Henry VIII’s Reformation seems inevitable. However this orthodoxy has now been challenged by an alternative vision of a vibrant, well-led and popular Church at the focus of the local community. This day course will examine the debate, and attempt a conclusion.

Joseph Oakley BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 06 May 2017
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Olmecs of Ancient Mexico (Cancelled)

The Olmecs ('rubber people') of the swampy Gulf lowlands were Mesoamerica’s first civilisation. San Lorenzo (1200-900 BC) and La Venta (900-400 BC) were ceremonial centres with vast complexes of pyramid/mound, courtyards and compounds housing the ruler and his family, where the first Mesoamerican ball court, life-sized basalt sculptures, fantastic burial chambers and serpentine pavements were unearthed. Why were these sites destroyed by Olmecs themselves? Was slash-and-burn agriculture inadequate to support an increasingly complex society? Did the peasants rebel? We will consider the fascinating archaeological evidence.

Heather Brothwell MA MA LLB

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 13 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Soils: What The Microscope Tells Us

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Soils and their development are often affected by mankind, archiving activities. Many historical events are visible in soil through the naked eye, during archaeological investigation; however, some soil features remain hidden. Micromorphological analysis helps archaeological excavation by identifying micro-artefacts and soil features related to human activity. This one day course will provide an introduction to archaeological soils under the microscope. No previous knowledge of archaeology or soil is necessary. It is anticipated that this course will take place at the King’s Manor.

Carol Lang BSc PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 13 May 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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The Good, The Bad and The Ugly: Developing Characters in Fiction Writing

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Great characters make a story memorable. In this day course, aimed at beginners, we will discuss how to create characters that are interesting, believable, and well-rounded. As well as advice on how to avoid stereotypes, students will explore different narrative voices in their writing. We will consider the use of characters throughout a range of genres, and experiment with creating different character types. Finally, we will consider how personal experience can provide the spark and background for creating successful characters.

Rob O’Connor    BA MA CTLLS

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 13 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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An Introduction to Witchcraft

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Witches have always been part of the cultural landscape. How have different cultures perceived them, empowered them, and punished them? How are they incorporated into myths, religions and belief systems, and what effect did that have on the practitioners of witchcraft and their influence on communities? Powerful, romantic, revered, despised, punished, feared and endangered, witches have been all these things. This course will discuss the nature of witchcraft, past responses, and to what extent it still exists… and cast a spell or two.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 13 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Mysteries of the Bayeux Tapestry

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The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the events of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. Although most of the scenes convey events which are relatively straightforward to construe, there have been difficulties in interpreting others, such as characters who cannot be identified and actions which do not appear to correspond to the narrative. This course aims to examine the anomalies found in the tapestry as well as to explore the recent scholarship connected with the tapestry’s design and production.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 13 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Art Nouveau (Second Cohort FULL - third class on 27 May)

Art Nouveau was the response to an age, a diverse and wide-ranging artistic movement that spanned art, architecture, theatre, dance and the decorative arts, reflecting an era of rapid social, political and technological change. In the morning, the course will consider the development of the movement and examine some of its most prominent practitioners, placing them in a historical and artistic context. In the afternoon, we will head into York to find some surviving examples of Art Nouveau. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 20 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Moche of Ancient Peru (Cancelled)

In the desert coastal lowlands of north Peru, the Moche culture flourished from AD 100-800. This pre-Inca people were known for their huge, dazzlingly painted adobe pyramids at Huaca de la Luna and Huaca del Sol, and their vividly painted and beautifully modelled ceramics. We will look at this complex, mysterious culture, explore current thinking about Moche politics, history, society and religion, and see how the Moche, who had no system of writing, used their extraordinary ceramics to convey information about their lives and beliefs.

Heather Brothwell MA MA LLB

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 20 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Caring for our Historic Houses

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Our historic houses are an integral part of our national and cultural identity. Layered with accretions of the centuries, their exteriors and interiors often bear witness to changes in politics, fashion, ownership, and religious turmoil. They are at risk from not only human intervention, but also environmental and biological agents. This lecture will explore the history of conservation of the historic house and the National Trust, the risks posed to historic house collections, and how professionals work to preserve them.

Tracy Wilcockson BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 20 May 2017
  • Time: 10am-1pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Richard II: York and the Peasants' Revolt

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In 1396, Richard II gave York the status of a county in its own right, a sword of state and a cap of maintenance, as a reward for the city's loyalty. Yet in 1380 and 1381, York's citizens had revolted against the king, ransacked church property and attacked Bootham Bar. This day school examines the reasons why the city revolted, including the Black Death, the consequences of revolt, and how York regained the trust of Richard II. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 27 May 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Beethoven’s Symphonies

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Beethoven’s nine symphonies chart the shift from the Classical to Romantic eras in music. Starting with works that inherit traits from the classicism of Haydn, by the time we reach the ninth ‘Choral’ symphony, the doors are opened for the likes of Mahler. With opportunities for listening to extracts, this day-long course gives an insight into the history behind the symphonies, why they were written, how we might approach them, and why they remain so important today.

Martin Scheuregger BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 27 May 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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An Introduction to Attachment Theory

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Attachment theory is considered as one of the most important concepts in many areas of psychology. Each of us has an attachment style that is developed throughout our lifespan, starting from our very first attachment experiences as an infant. This attachment style influences how we interact with other people and how we behave in our relationships with others. This course will provide a basic introduction to the core ideas within attachment theory, including the different attachment styles and their characteristics.

Laura Oxley BSc MEd MBPsS

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 27 May 2017
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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Art Nouveau [Third Cohort]

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Art Nouveau was the response to an age, a diverse and wide-ranging artistic movement that spanned art, architecture, theatre, dance and the decorative arts, reflecting an era of rapid social, political and technological change. In the morning, the course will consider the development of the movement and examine some of its most prominent practitioners, placing them in a historical and artistic context. In the afternoon, we will head into York to find some surviving examples of Art Nouveau. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Kate Stephenson BSc MRes MLitt

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 27 May 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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June

An Introduction to Fossils

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Why do fossils matter? What do palaeontologists do? How can shells and bones tell us the history of life on Earth? All these topics and more will be examined in this one-day palaeontology course, uncovering the pioneers of the subject, the fossils you're most likely to discover and the best places to find them. Participants will study the common fossil groups, learn how to identify fossil tracks and traces, and learn how to identify ancient environments based on key fossil types. No previous experience of the subject is necessary.

Liam Herringshaw BSc PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 03 June 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Were the Tudors Like Us? English Society (1485-1603)

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The Tudors are like us yet unlike, familiar but strange. Using an extensive range of examples and visual sources, this course will attempt to capture some of the essence of Tudor society, from Hardwick Hall ('more glass than wall') to the humble cottage of the ploughman, from the feasts of the rich to the coarse (and occasionally hallucinatory) bread of the poor, from exploding chimneys and tavern brawls to the 'delights' of bear baiting and Shakespearean theatre in lawless Southwark.

Joseph Oakley BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 03 June 2017
  • Time: 1-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £20.00

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York’s City Walls (Second cohort)

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Built, reshaped and repurposed, York’s city walls have been a key aspect of defence, power, trade, civic pride, urban development and tourism. Utilising archaeological and documentary evidence, we will explore the changing roles and uses of York’s iconic walls. We will focus primarily on the medieval period, where York’s city walls were at their largest, most important, and most flexible in function. Based at the King's Manor, this session will include a guided tour of key survivals and hidden gems, along with some often overlooked features.

Barry Crump BA BSc MRes

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 June 2017
  • Time: 10.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Medieval Best Sellers: Chaucer and Dante

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Popularity of a medieval text is measured by the number of its surviving manuscripts; by this measure Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Dante’s Divine Comedy were medieval ‘bestsellers’. What features in these texts made them so popular? What historical evidence of their popularity do we have? This one-day course aims to study the historical relevance of both texts against the backdrop of fourteenth-century England and Italy.

Cristina Figueredo BA MA PhD

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 June 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Modern Art in 100 Works (1900-2015)

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This course aims to give an overview of modern and contemporary art. We will fit 100 art works into a geographical and temporal web of historical events, exploring changing styles and emerging issues. The work will move off the canvas, away from the palette and into strange venues. One final question will be: 'Is painting still a valid art form?' This course may complement 'Art History in 100 Paintings (c20,000 to 1900)', or can be taken on its own.

Fiona Fitzgerald BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 10 June 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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A Day with Philip Larkin (Second cohort)

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Larkin has been described as the greatest, if gloomy, post-war poet, as well as a novelist, librarian and jazz critic. Deprivation for him was, he said, what daffodils were for Wordsworth. This course attempts to refocus Larkin, as a humane observer of human emotion. His poetry is full of pinpoint accuracy in detailing emotional crisis, tenderness and startling and poignant observations. His truths are troubling ones, beautifully revealed. This course will consider Larkin's poetry, the complicated man, and discover why the poetry touches readers so deeply.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 17 June 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Elizabeth and the Cult of Gloriana

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In 1558, a young woman was crowned queen and, despite the attempts of her courtiers, ruled England alone and unmarried for 45 years. How did Elizabeth rule and control her male courtiers and rebellious subjects? How did she play off her suitors against each other and why did she never marry? What was the Cult of Gloriana and what part did it play in her reign? This day school examines Elizabeth’s career, from bastard princess to Virgin Queen using portraits and contemporary accounts. It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 17 June 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Exploring Human Values: Being One's Self, Being For Others? (Cancelled)

The idea of being true to one’s self is a natural consequence of the liberal humanism of the Enlightenment. Recent applications in philosophy and psychology have been notoriously problematic however, because the priority of the individual is usually achieved at the expense of society. This class will explore the relation between the values attached to self and other by drawing on the thought of two of the twentieth-century’s greatest minds, Michel Foucault and Simone de Beauvoir.

Rafe McGregor  PhD PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 17 June 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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How to Create a Strong Narrative Drive

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All prose writing - whether short story or novel - needs a strong narrative drive. It's the engine of your story which grabs the reader and keeps them riveted. Without it, stories feel a little flat. So how do you create a strong narrative drive? How do you sustain it throughout your story? In a day of writing and discussion, we'll explore the arts of suspense, mystery and dramatic irony. We'll look at published examples and practise key techniques with writing exercises, all designed to improve your skill at storytelling.

Sue Cooper MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 24 June 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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A Day with Philip Larkin (FULL - second cohort now available 17 June 2017)

Larkin has been described as the greatest, if gloomy, post-war poet, as well as a novelist, librarian and jazz critic. Deprivation for him was, he said, what daffodils were for Wordsworth. This course attempts to refocus Larkin, as a humane observer of human emotion. His poetry is full of pinpoint accuracy in detailing emotional crisis, tenderness and startling and poignant observations. His truths are troubling ones, beautifully revealed. This course will consider Larkin's poetry, the complicated man, and discover why the poetry touches readers so deeply.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 24 June 2017
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Did Shakespeare visit York? (Cancelled)

Did Shakespeare ever visit York? And if he did... what would York have looked like through his eyes? We will investigate Shakespeare’s early life and the intriguing connections with the city of York and the King’s Manor. We will also explore Shakepeare’s York, including Margaret Clitherow, King James I’s visit to the city in 1603, and an intriguing case in 1609 where a performance of a Shakespearean play resulted in gentry closely associated with the city being imprisoned for treason! It is anticipated that this course will be held at the King's Manor.

Gillian Waters BA MA PGDip PGCE

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 24 June 2017
  • Time: 10am-4pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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York’s City Walls (FULL - second cohort available)

Built, reshaped and repurposed, York’s city walls have been a key aspect of defence, power, trade, civic pride, urban development and tourism. Utilising archaeological and documentary evidence, we will explore the changing roles and uses of York’s iconic walls. We will focus primarily on the medieval period, where York’s city walls were at their largest, most important, and most flexible in function. Based at the King's Manor, this session will include a guided tour of key survivals and hidden gems, along with some often overlooked features.

Barry Crump BA BSc MRes

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start Date: 24 June 2017
  • Time: 10.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Key

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