Andreas Heinemeyer
Senior Researcher and Research Group Leader

Profile

Biography

Andreas became Research Group Leader in October 2014. He has over 15 years experience in the field of terrestrial carbon cycling focussing on impacts of management and climate change on the soil in forests, agriculture and peatlands, and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems and ecosystem services provisioning. He developed the MILLENNIA peatland model and uses other carbon models such as Century and DNDC. Recently, he was involved in the UNFCCC in relation to defining peatlands as carbon stores within UN agreements. At the national level, he is involved in many groups related to peatland functioning and management, for example, the Upland Hydrology group and the Upland Management group.

Andreas contributes to teaching in the Department of Environment and Geography in Climate Change modules with a focus on the role of agriculture and land use change and potential carbon cycle-climate feedbacks.

Key skills

Climate change and terrestrial ecosystem ecology, biogeochemistry, atmosphere-biosphere gas exchange, soil-vegetation-atmosphere modelling (Century, DNDC), agriculture, carbon sequestration and peatland functioning (MILLENNIA peatland model).

Career

Andreas joined SEI York in 2002 as a post doctoral researcher within the Centre for Terrestrial Carbon Dynamics (CTCD). Since 2008 he then joint the National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), a follow up of the CTCD.

Andreas also holds PhD in Biology on carbon allocation in the mycorrhizal symbioses from the University of York and works as a part time lecturer at the Centre for Life Long Learning at York University and is a frequent speaker at outreach events on the science of climate change.

  • MSc (Biology, University of Goettingen, Germany)
  • PhD (Biology/Mycorrhizal carbon allocation, University of York)
  • 2002 to 2008: PDRA at Centre of Terrestrial Carbon Dynamics (CTCD), York
  • 2008-2011: PDRA at the National Centre of Earth Observation (NCEO), York
  • 2011-2012: PI on UKPopNet project on peatland carbon cycling
  • 2012-2014: Senior Researcher at the SEI 
  • 2014 to present: Research Group Leader in Plant-Soil Science and Ecosystem Services

Departmental roles

  • Contributor to teaching in modules within Environmental Science and Climate Change

Research

Overview

Since joining SEI Andreas has developed research in the UK, Europe and Africa with collaborations stretching to the USA. He uses chamber based and Eddie Covariance (EC) tower (analytical) and plant-soil modelling (predictive) methods to estimate carbon dynamics from plot to landscape scales and investigate the effects of climate and management on carbon stocks and associated ecosystem services. He also monitors peatland hydrology and water quality from plot to catchments in relation to climate and management. This work has extended into research on litter decomposition to understand the mechanisms by which peatlands and other soils lock away carbon. He is particularly interested in improving methods and models to assess atmosphere-biosphere exchange of carbon and responses to environmental factors (with a particular focus on soil respiration component fluxes in view to reduce uncertainties in Earth System Modelling of potential carbon-climate feedbacks). To unravel soil fluxes he uses stable isotope labelling techniques (13C) and also radiocarbon (14C) dating.

Projects

Defra BD5104: “Restoration of blanket bog vegetation for biodiversity, carbon sequestration and water regulation” http://peatland-es-uk.york.ac.uk/ (Funder Defra UK; £850k; Nov 2011 – March 2017)
This project will acquire experimental data to underpin the development and refinement of possible management techniques, for example, applicable through Environmental Stewardship schemes, to address the dominance of heather (Calluna vulgaris) and facilitate the support of ‘active’ blanket bog vegetation (with peat-forming species, particularly Sphagnum spp.). This requires screening for the most suitable management techniques and then including those as part of a long-term manipulative experiment to provide scientifically sound and meaningful data upon which to base policy advice and subsequently inform management decisions, considering both, environmental and socio-economic implications.
SEI York staff: Andreas Heinemeyer (PI); Chris West, Harry Vallack
Partners: Yorkshire Peat Partnership, Natural England

Defra BD5104 contract variation: “to include assessment of management impacts on cranefly emergence and abundance to be related to bird populations” (Defra; £110k; March 2014 – March 2017)
This project is an extension of the BD5104 project investigating how burning and mowing potentially affect insect numbers, particularly craneflies, which are an important food source for several key upland bird species like Golden Plover and Dunlin but also Red Grouse. We collect trap data on cranefly emergence and also transect data on population sizes and relate those to bird numbers by modelling impacts on chick survival and growth. We will use the MILLENNIA peatland model to upscale in space and time as well as specific bird models making use of the collected cranefly and environmental data.
SEI York staff: Andreas Heinemeyer (PI); Rachel Pateman, Chris West
Partners: Moorland Association, Natural England, RSPB, BTO

MycoRhizaSoil “Combining wheat genotypes with cultivation methods to facilitate mycorrhizosphere organisms improving soil quality and crop resilience” (BBSRC/NERC; UK Research Councils; £110k Feb 2015 – Jan 2020)
Soil erosion as a result of arable cultivation is a major global constraint on crop yields and efficient use of fertilizer. Symbiotic fungi called mycorrhizas that receive sugars from plant roots in return for providing nutrients and water to the plants can help stabilise soil and contribute to soil organic matter storage. This work will determine the roles mycorrhiza and co-associated soil microorganisms play in maintaining soil structure and organic matter content. In a series of field trials using selected wheat lines the team will determine the extent to which artificial inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and adoption of no-tillage leads to improvements in soil quality and crop resilience to drought, excess water and native diseases compared to wheat grown conventionally with annual tillage.
SEI York Staff: Andreas Heinemeyer (PI);
Partners: University of Leeds, University of Sheffield (lead P), University of York (Biology Dep.).

Supervision

Phoebe Morton – Assessing management and climate impacts on blanket bog carbon cycling and associated ecosystem services.

Publications

Selected publications

 

Selected Scientific Publications

Carroll, M. J., Heinemeyer, A., Pearce-Higgins, J. W., Dennis, P., West, C., Holden, J., ... Thomas, C. D. (2015). Hydrologically driven ecosystem processes determine the distribution and persistence of ecosystem-specialist predators under climate change. Nature communications, 6, 1-10. [7851]. 10.1038/ncomms8851

A. Milcu, M. Lukac, J.-A. Subke, A. Heinemeyer, D. Wildman, R. Anderson, P. Manning & P. Ineson (2012) Biotic carbon feedbacks in a materially-closed soil-vegetation-atmosphere system, Nature Climate Change, 2: 281-284.

S. Vicca, S. Luyssaert, J. Peñuelas, M. Campioli, Chapin FS III., P. Ciais, A. Heinemeyer, P. Högberg, W.L. Kutsch, B.E. Law, Y. Malhi, D. Papale, S.L. Piao, M. Reichstein, E.D. Schulze, I.A. Janssens (2012) Fertile forests produce biomass more efficiently. Ecology Letters, 15: 520-526.

A. Heinemeyer , V. Gruber & M. Bahn (2012) The ‘Gas-Snake’: Design and validation of a versatile membrane-based gas flux measurement system in a grassland soil respiration study. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 154-155: 166-173.

A. Heinemeyer & N.P. McNamara (2011) Comparing the closed static versus the closed dynamic chamber flux methodology: implications for soil respiration studies. Plant and Soil, 346: 145–151.

A. Heinemeyer , M. Wilkinson, R. Vargas, J.-A. Subke, E. Casella, J.I.L. Morison & P. Ineson (2012) Exploring the “overflow tap” theory: linking forest soil CO2 fluxes and individual mycorrhizosphere components to photosynthesis. Biogeosciences, 9, 79–95.

J.C.R. Smarta, K. Hicks, T. Morrissey, A. Heinemeyer, D. Raffaelli, M.A. Sutton & M. Ashmore (2011) Applying the Ecosystem Service Concept to Air Quality Management in the UK: a Case Study for Ammonia. Environmetrics, 22: 649–661.

A. Heinemeyer
, C. Di Bene, A.R. Lloyd, D. Tortorella, R. Baxter, B. Huntley, A. Gelsomino &  P. Ineson (2011) Soil respiration: implications of the plant-soil continuum and respiration chamber collar-insertion depth on measurement and modelling of soil CO2 efflux rates in three ecosystems. European Journal of Soil Science, 62: 82–94.

A. Heinemeyer
, S. Croft, M.H. Garnett, M. Gloor, J. Holden, M.R. Lomas & P. Ineson (2010) The MILLENNIA peat cohort model, predicting past, present and future soil carbon budgets and fluxes under changing climates in peatlands. Climate Research (Special Issue: Climate Change & the British Uplands), 45: 207–226

F. Eigenbrod, B.J. Anderson, P.R. Armsworth, A. Heinemeyer, S.F. Jackson, M. Parnell, C.D. Thomas & K.J. Gaston (2009) Ecosystem service benefits of contrasting conservation strategies in a human-dominated region. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 276: 2903-2911 ; doi : 10.1098/rspb.2009.0528.

B.J. Anderson, P.R. Armsworth, F. Eigenbrod, C.D. Thomas, S. Gillings, A. Heinemeyer, D.B. Roy, K.J. Gaston (2009) Spatial covariance between biodiversity and other ecosystem services. Journal of Applied Ecology, 46:888-896.

I.P. Hartley, A. Heinemeyer, S.P. Evans, P. Ineson (2007). The effect of soil warming on bulk soil versus rhizosphere respiration. Global Change Biology , 13: 2654-2667.

A. Heinemeyer , I.P. Hartley, S.P. Evans, J.A. Carreira de la Fuente, P. Ineson (2007) Forest soil CO2 flux: uncovering the contribution and environmental responses of ectomycorrhizas. Global Change Biology 13 : 1786–1797.

A. Heinemeyer , P. Ineson, N. Ostle and A.H. Fitter (2006). Respiration of the external mycelium in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis shows strong dependence on recent photosynthates and acclimation to temperature. New Phytologist , 171: 159-170.

F. Eigenbrod, B.J. Anderson, P.R. Armsworth, A. Heinemeyer, S.F. Jackson, M. Parnell, C.D. Thomas & K.J. Gaston (2009) Ecosystem service benefits of contrasting conservation strategies in a human-dominated region. Proceedings of the Royal Society B doi: 10.1098/rspb.2009.0528.

B.J. Anderson, P.R. Armsworth, F. Eigenbrod, C.D. Thomas, S. Gillings, A. Heinemeyer, D.B. Roy, K.J. Gaston (2009) Spatial covariance between biodiversity and other ecosystem services. Journal of Applied Ecology 46: 888-896.
 

Full publications list

Click here for full list of publications

Book chapters and reports

  • Soil Carbon Dynamics: An Integrated Methodology. Eds. Kutsch W, Bahn M & Heinemeyer A. Cambridge University Press (published in Oct 2009; ISBN: ISBN-13: 9780521865616). (REF)
  • Subke J-A, Heinemeyer A & Reichstein M. Experimental design to scale up in time and space and its statistical considerations. In: Soil Carbon Dynamics: An Integrated Methodology. Eds. Kutsch W, Bahn M & Heinemeyer A. Cambridge University Press.
  • Moyano FE, Atkin OK, Bahn M, Bruhn D, Burton AJ, Heinemeyer A, Kutsch W, Wieser G. Respiration from Roots and the Mycorrhizosphere. In: Soil Carbon Dynamics: An Integrated Methodology. Eds. Kutsch W, Bahn M & Heinemeyer A. Cambridge University Press.
  • Rodeghiero M, Heinemeyer A, Schrumpf M, Bellamy P. Determination of changes in soil carbon stocks. In: Soil Carbon Dynamics: An Integrated Methodology. Eds. Kutsch W, Bahn M & Heinemeyer A. Cambridge University Press.
  • Kutsch W, Bahn M, Heinemeyer A & IA Janssens. Towards a standardized protocol for the measurement of soil CO2 efflux. In: Soil Carbon Dynamics: An Integrated Methodology. Eds. Kutsch W., Bahn M. Heinemeyer A. Cambridge University Press.
  • Kutsch W, Bahn M & Heinemeyer A. Soil carbon relations – an overview. In: Soil Carbon Dynamics: An Integrated Methodology. Eds. Kutsch W., Bahn M. Heinemeyer A. Cambridge University Press.
  • Bahn M, Kutsch W & Heinemeyer A. Emerging issues and challenges for an integrated understanding of soil carbon fluxes. In: Soil Carbon Dynamics: An Integrated Methodology. Eds. Kutsch W., Bahn M. Heinemeyer A. Cambridge University Press.

Teaching

Other teaching

Andreas teaches the following courses:

 

a) Centre for Life Long Learning: Ecology and Systems' thinking as part of the accreddited course 'Urban Hotriculture'.

b) Department of Environment and Geography: Global carbon dynamics - linking atmosphere, plant and soil as part of Dr Nicola Carslaw's climate change module.



Andreas Heinemeyer

Andreas Heinemeyer

Telephone: 07552 285902

Email: andreas.heinemeyer@york.ac.uk

@AndreasHeinem