The Building Accounts for St Stephen's Chapel, Palace of Westminster, 1292-1366 ‌‌

The Project

The Project

This project, led by Dr Tim Ayers, will make available for the first time a full critical edition and translation of the fabric accounts for St Stephen’s Chapel in the Palace of Westminster, the greatest and most enduring site of English government. The chapel was rebuilt by Edward I from 1292, but completed only by Edward III in the 1360s. By this time, it had been richly decorated with architectural sculpture, stained glass and paintings.

Produced by the king’s exchequer and now in The National Archives, the manuscript accounts are exceptionally full. They document the processes of royal patronage in great detail and are fundamental to an understanding of English royal display. They are also of international significance as evidence for medieval crafts and their working practices, with a wide range of other potential applications for economic and social historians. The accounts are being transcribed and translated by Dr Maureen Jurkowski.

The project will run for two years in parallel with a wider, interdisciplinary research project entitled ‘St. Stephen's Chapel, Westminster: Visual and Political Culture, 1292-1941’ (1 October 2013 to 30 September 2016), on which Dr Ayers is the Co-Investigator.

The Grant

The Grant

A Leverhulme Trust Research Project Grant

Funding:  £118,800

Duration: Two Years (January 2013 to December 2014)

Lead Investigator: Dr Tim Ayers

Leverhulme Trust Logo

The Team

The Team

Dr Tim Ayers, Principal Investigator, and editor of the volume.

Dr Maureen Jurkowski, transcribing and translating the accounts.

Events

Events

There will be a study day in 2014 to explore the potential of the accounts for future study, involving participants from different disciplines. More details to follow.

Resources

Resources

A critical edition of the accounts, with a translation, is to be published.

Information on both of the projects concerning St Stephen’s Chapel will soon be available at the project website.