Assessing the Risks and Opportunities for Species in England as a Result of Climate Change

Departments:  Biology, Environment

Project Director:  Dr Colin Beale

 There is an increasing need for conservation organisations to target their actions to help species that are being affected by climate change. Some species which are currently threatened may benefit from climate change, whilst others not currently regarded as being of conservation concern may face new threats. Earlier work developed a framework to assess the risks and benefits that climate change poses to species and this project brings together a wide team to apply the framework to a wide range of English species. Work at York focusses on modelling the distributions and likely changes in over 4000 English plant and animal species.

Work at York involves modelling the distribution of English species, resulting in maps like this one for The Ring Ouzel, an upland bird possibly threatened by climate change.
Work at York involves modelling the distribution of English species, resulting in maps like this one for
The Ring Ouzel, an upland bird possibly threatened by climate change.


Full details of the project are available at the project website.

‌Funding:  Natural England

Partners:  British Trust for Ornithology, The Centre for Ecology and Hydration, The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Natural England