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Women’s Studies Now!

From the climate emergency through attacks on women’s bodily autonomy to the place of gender in far-right populist discourse, Women’s Studies is uniquely placed to shine a critical light on some of the most urgent topics facing the world today. To this end, York’s Centre for Women’s Studies is delighted to announce a new research seminar series that will run in the academic year 2022-2023: Women’s Studies Now! As well as exploring many such critical topics, Women’s Studies Now! brings together some of the cutting-edge feminist research being conducted at the University of York and beyond. The series kicks off in autumn term with two roundtable events and a talk on the feminist uprising in Iran:

Wednesday 19 October, 4.30pm: Roundtable on Gender and Migration. (See below for further details)

Tuesday 25 October, 5pm: “Women, Life, Freedom”: A Feminist Uprising in Iran, Zahra Tizro, University of East London (See below for further details)

Monday 21 November, 3.30pm: Roundtable on Gender and Violence, marking the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 25 November.

All events take place in Treehouse, Berrick Saul Bulding, Campus West and will be followed by a drinks reception

Roundtable on Gender and Violence: 3.30 pm, Monday 21 November

Chaired by Clare Bielby (CWS, UoY), the event features the following speakers:


Boriana Alexandrova is a Senior Lecturer in Centre for Women’s Studies, University of York. She is the author of Joyce, Multilingualism, and the Ethics of Reading (Palgrave, 2020) and has published articles on multilingual modernism, disability, trauma, and translation in Modernism/modernity (“The Body Politic in Pain” Special Online Issue, 2023), European Joyce Studies, and elsewhere. Her new project, Storytelling the Unspeakable: Trauma's Languages in Modern Literature and Performance, explores new, arts-led methods of both storytelling and reading the “scrappy archive” of trauma histories. Her case studies include contemporary #MeToo memoirs, performance artists such as Johanna Hedva and Marina Abramovic, queer Surrealists and anti-Nazi Resistance fighters Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore, and others. 

Harriet Gray is a Senior Lecturer in International Relations in the Department of Politics, University of York. Her research focuses primarily on gender-based violence in armed forces and conflict spaces. Harriet has conducted research on domestic violence and sexual violence in the British military, and on multiple forms of GBV in (post)conflict settings in the African Great Lakes region. Her current work focuses on the memorialisation of sexual violence across war and peace in the contemporary USA. One of the key threads that binds her work to date together is an interest in unpacking the gendered processes through which harmful acts are storied in dominant discourse – in particular, how various acts come to be understood (or, do not come to be understood) as ‘violence,’ as ‘sexual/gender-based violence’ and as ‘conflict-related sexual/gender-based violence’ –and in the political implications of these definitional processes.


Sui-Ting Kong is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Durham University. Her academic interests are in feminist participatory methodologies, social work practice research and violence against women at the intersection of personal and political lives. Her recent research involves working with women activists in Hong Kong and the Hongkonger diaspora in the UK to understand the wider gender and personal impact of social movements. Sui-ting currently holds a British Academy/Wolfson Fellowship on the contested identities of Hongkongers and their community and home building in the UK.


Zahra Tizro is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychological Sciences, University of East London, having previously taught at York St John University. With degrees in psychology and gender studies, Zahra’s research interests focus on gender and violence from a cross-cultural perspective. In the context of her PhD, conducted at CWS, York, she investigated the issues surrounding domestic violence against women in Iran which resulted in the monograph Domestic Violence in Iran: Women, Marriage and Islam (Routledge, 2012). A particular interest is the exploration of violence at different scales, from the interpersonal to the international, with an empirical and theoretical focus on national and international relations. Zahra’s most recent book (co-authored with Farhad Gohardani) is The Political Economy of Iran: Development, Revolution and Political Violence (Palgrave, 2019).

 

“Women, Life, Freedom”: A Feminist Uprising in Iran

Zahra Tizro, University of East London, 5pm, Tuesday 25 October

“In this seminar I will talk about the most recent uprising in Iran following the death of a young Kurdish girl, Mahsa Amini, who sadly died while on custody of the morality police in Iran. I will discuss the issue of compulsory hijab in Iran and its political and social ramifications for Iranian women as well as Muslim women around the world.” 

Zahra Tizro is senior lecturer in the department of Psychological Sciences, University of East London, having previously taught at York St John University. With degrees in psychology and gender studies, Zahra’s research interests focus on gender and violence from a cross-cultural perspective. In the context of her PhD, conducted at CWS, York, she investigated the issues surrounding domestic violence against women in Iran which resulted in the monograph Domestic Violence in Iran: Women, Marriage and Islam (Routledge, 2012). A particular interest is the exploration of violence at different scales, from the interpersonal to the international, with an empirical and theoretical focus on national and international relations. Zahra’s most recent book (co-authored with Farhad Gohardani) is The Political Economy of Iran: Development, Revolution and Political Violence (Palgrave, 2019).

 

Roundtable on Gender and Migration: 4.30pm, Wednesday 19 October

Chaired by Rachel Alsop (CWS, UoY), the event features the following panellists:

Haleemah Alaydi

Haleemah is a doctoral researcher in the Department of English and Related Literature at the University of York. Her doctoral thesis, fully funded by the Acton-Goodman Scholarship, investigates the representation of the Palestinian refugee experience between 1940s and present-day in contemporary short fiction. Her short story “A Very Private Confession” was published by Valley Press in 2021 in an edited short story anthology This New North. Haleemah is a Northern Short Story Festival Academician (2020) and a member of UoY Migration Network.

Sara de Jong

Sara is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of York. She is the author of the book Complicit Sisters: Gender and Women's Issues Across North-South Divides, published by OUP in 2017. Her current research is on the claims to rights and protection by Afghan interpreters who worked for Western Armies with some findings recently published in the International Feminist Journal of Politics (article title: “Segregated brotherhood: the military masculinities of Afghan interpreters and other locally employed civilians”).

Joy Ogbemudia

Joy is a Senior Lecturer at the Leeds Business School, with the Leadership, Governance and People Management Subject Group, Leeds Beckett University. She is the Author of The Migration of Professional Women from Nigeria to the UK: Narratives of Work, Family Life and Adaptation, published by Routledge in 2022. Joy is an alumna of CWS, having completed her PhD there.

Daria Lynch (she/they)

Daria is a PhD researcher in the Departments of Archaeology and History at the University of York. Studying the history and spatial politics of migration in York, Daria works in collaboration with the York Civic Trust and is funded by the White Rose College of Arts & Humanities (WRoCAH). Daria’s master’s dissertation focused on environmental and migrant history, with a particular emphasis on the spatial politics of urban gardens in Germany and the involvement in them of migrant communities. She applies this experience to the study of migrant heritage in her PhD, employing ecofeminist and anarchist theories to investigate the migrant experience of placemaking and belonging in the city of York.